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#115 Geriatric Depression

09.24.2018 - By The Curbsiders Internal Medicine Podcast

EPISODE DESCRIPTION

Summary Geriatric depression got you down? Boost your spirits with tips and tactics from Geriatric Psychiatrist, Dennis Popeo MD, Clinical Associate Professor of Psychiatry at NYU Langone Medical Center. Topics include: suicide in the older adults; how to diagnosis depression in older adults; how to counsel patients about antidepressants, how to choose an antidepressant, how to monitor and titrate medications, and how long to continue therapy. Stay tuned for part two of our discussion with Dr Popeo on managing sleep and behavioral problems in older adult patients with dementia. Full show notes available at http://thecurbsiders.com/podcast. Join our mailing list and receive a PDF copy of our show notes every Monday. Rate us on iTunes, recommend a guest or topic and give feedback at thecurbsiders@gmail.com. Credits Written & Produced by: Jordana Kozupsky NP, Matthew Watto MD Artwork by: Kate Grant MD Hosts: Jordana Kozupsky NP, Matthew Watto MD Editor: Matthew Watto MD Guest: Dennis Popeo, MD Time Stamps 00:00 A question for you, the listeners 01:12 Disclaimer, intro and guest bio 05:00 Getting to know our guest, recommendations for reading, and career advice 14:13 Case of geriatric depression; effective history taking; recognizing associated symptoms; depression scales 19:03 Suicide in older adults; firearm safety 24:26 Choice of therapy; Pharmacologic agents; Counseling patients and managing expectations; Dose titration and tracking symptoms 34:41 Augmenting therapy versus cross-titration to another agent; When is it okay to stop an antidepressant 40:50 Take home points 44:40 Outro Tags: psychiatry, psych, geri, geriatrics, depression, mdd, sleep, insomnia, appetite, agitation, suicide, SSRIs, side, effects, therapy, diagnosis, serotonin, mirtazapine, bupropion, assistant, care, doctor, education, family, FOAM, FOAMim, FOAMed, health, hospitalist, hospital, internal, internist, meded, medical, medicine, nurse, practitioner, professional, primary, physician, resident, student

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#141 Wound Care Pearls

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02.11.2019

#138 Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Crohn’s and Ulcerative Colitis

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02.04.2019

#137 Hyperkalemia Master Class with Joel Topf MD

Master the management of hyperkalemia with tools, tips and tactics from @kidney_boy, Joel Topf MD, Chief of Nephrology @KashlakHospital. We cover: common causes of hyperkalemia; the U-shaped curve of potassium levels and mortality; albuterol nebs; how to safely use insulin; potassium binding resins and colonic necrosis; Does it make sense to give loop diuretics and fluids?; Should we be using fludrocortisone?; Plus, answers to all your questions about a high potassium diet and oral potassium supplements! Join us for Dr Topf’s masterful insights on hyperkalemia and potassium homeostasis. Full show notes available at http://thecurbsiders.com/podcast. Join our mailing list and receive a PDF copy of our show notes every Monday. Rate us on iTunes, recommend a guest or topic and give feedback at thecurbsiders@gmail.com. Sponsor Join us at ACP's Internal Medicine Meeting 2019 April 11-13th in Philadelphia, PA . We'll see you there! Credits Written and produced by: Matthew Watto, MD Hosts: Matthew Watto MD, Paul Williams MD, Stuart Brigham MD Infographic: Matthew Watto MD Edited by: Matthew Watto MD Guest: Dr Joel Topf MD   Time Stamps 00:00 Ad disclaimer, intro and guest bio 05:11 Guest one-liner and picks of the week —Peloton indoor cycle, “your local library”, The Nice Guys (film) by Shane Black, and Forgotten Hand (PS4 game) 11:17 ACP Internal Medicine Meeting 2019 details 12:55 Clinical case of hyperkalemia; discussion of pseudohyperkalemia 19:55 Hyperkalemia and the EKG 23:38 Threshold for treatment of hyperkalemia 27:20 Use of telemetry and the U-shaped curve for potassium and mortality 30:11 Choice of therapy for acute hyperkalemia 33:13 Albuterol for hyperkalemia 34:24 First rule out urinary obstruction and hyperglycemia; Use of IV insulin and dextrose and frequency of monitoring 39:44 Loop diuretics plus fluid; Distal sodium delivery and potassium handling in the nephron 43:10 Fludrocortisone for hyperkalemia 45:05 Calcium for elevated potassium 48:43 SPS, potassium binding resin 52:43 Risks of SPS (sodium polystyrene sulfonate) and colonic necrosis 58:28 Sodium bicarbonate for acute and chronic hyperkalemia 61:00 Back to the case; TMP-SMX, ace inhibitors (or ARBs) and hyperkalemia 63:05 Threshold for admission; Diet and potassium 65:52 Treatment of chronic hyperkalemia and a bit more on high potassium foods 68:45 Patiromer and sodium zirconium 71:51 Loop diuretics and empiric potassium supplementation 74:12 Can diet alone be used to treat HYPOkalemia? 75:26 Take home points 77:40 NephMadness is coming! March 2019 79:53 Outro 81:00 More Kidney Boy!

01.28.2019

#136 Sickle Cell Disease, Management & Complications

Stuck on sickle cell disease? We hammer out the basics of diagnosis, common sickle cell variants and their manifestations, preventive medicine, acute and chronic pain management, opioid use, and how to recognize and treat common complications like anemia, fever and acute chest syndrome. Sickle cell expert, Sophie Lanzkron MD, Associate Professor of Medicine and Oncology and Director of the Sickle Cell Center for Adults at Johns Hopkins joins! Full show notes available at http://thecurbsiders.com/podcast. Join our mailing list and receive a PDF copy of our show notes every Monday. Rate us on iTunes, recommend a guest or topic and give feedback at thecurbsiders@gmail.com. Sponsor ACP's Internal Medicine Meeting 2019 April 11-13th in Philadelphia, PA. We'll see you there! Credits Written (including CME questions) and produced by: Justin Berk MD, Martha Brucato MD PhD, Beth Garbitelli MS1 Hosts: Paul Williams MD, Justin Berk MD, Matthew Watto MD Edited by: Matthew Watto MD Guest: Sophie Lanzkron MD MHS Time Stamps 00:00 Announcements, intro 02:30 A quick refresher on hemoglobinopathy 03:45 Guest bio 05:03 Guest one-liner, movie recommendation, career advice, picks of the week 10:53 ACP Internal Medicine Meeting 2019 (ad read) 12:33 Clinical case; defining sickle cell; pathophysiology 16:23 Different types of hemoglobinopathy genotypes and phenotypes 20:20 Preventive care for sickle cell disease 22:56 Taking a history at the initial visit in patient with sickle disease 26:40 Life expectancy in SCD 28:30 Hydroxyurea 30:40 Chronic red blood cell transfusion therapy; complications; monitoring 37:07 Silent cerebral infarcts and mild cognitive impairment in SCD  40:10 Chronic pain management; opioid use disorder in sickle cell disease 46:00 Acute pain crisis management; PCAs vs bolus therapy 54:08 Reticulocyte count in sickle cell disease 55:40 Itching, opioids and naloxone? 58:10 Red blood cell transfusion threshold in sickle cell disease (anemia) 60:03 Acute fever in SCD 61:48 Acute chest syndrome 66:45 Transition from pediatrics to adult medicine in sickle cell 68:00 Incentive spirometry to prevent acute chest syndrome 68:45 Take home points 70:00 Outro

01.21.2019

#135 Perioperative Medicine

Optimize perioperative risk and dominate perioperative medicine. Topics include surgical risk calculators, preoperative labs, stress testing, use of BNP and troponins, postoperative MI, cardiac and pulmonary risk stratification, and more! We’re joined by perioperative medicine expert, Avital O’Glasser MD, Associate Professor of Medicine at Oregon Health & Science University and Assistant Program Director for Scholarship and Social Media. ACP members can visit https://acponline.org/curbsiders to claim free CME-MOC credit for this episode and show notes (goes live 0900 EST). Full show notes available at http://thecurbsiders.com/podcast. Join our mailing list and receive a PDF copy of our show notes every Monday. Rate us on iTunes, recommend a guest or topic and give feedback at thecurbsiders@gmail.com. Credits Written and produced by: Matthew Watto MD CME questions by: Matthew Watto MD Hosts: Matthew Watto MD, Stuart Brigham MD Edited by: Matthew Watto MD Guest: Avital O’Glasser MD Time Stamps 00:00 Disclaimer, intro and guest bio 04:20 Guest one-liner, book and movie recommendations, career advice 11:20 ACP Internal Medicine Meeting 2019 details 14:02 Patient with coronary artery calcifications going for elective hip surgery and wants "clearance" 20:50 Functional capacity 25:00 Preoperative stress testing and coronary revascularization 31:55 Canadian guidelines, BNP and troponin testing 36:30 The METS trial and predicting perioperative cardiac events and mortality 40:44 Preoperative testing (labs, imaging, urine studies) 50:24 Choosing your perioperative cardiac and surgical risk calculator (RCRI, MICA, ACS-NSQIP) 59:50 Communicating risk to patient and their surgeon 61:30 Pulmonary risk assessment and complications 70:35 Perioperative use of opioids 75:30 Who needs an echocardiogram prior to surgery? 79:00 Canceling a patient's surgery 82:55 Take home points 83:45 Outro

01.14.2019

#134 Urinary Tract Infections Delirium and Voltaire

“Urinary tract infections” (UTIs) are overdiagnosed. Antibiotics are overprescribed. UTIs are inappropriately blamed for geriatric syndromes (eg delirium) despite little supporting evidence. Our guest, Tom Finucane MD, Emeritus Professor of Medicine at Johns Hopkins makes us question everything. Topics: How can we diagnose “UTI”? Who needs treatment? Do urinary tract symptoms matter? Does malodorous urine correlate with infection? Who’s at risk for pyelonephritis and sepsis? Don’t miss this paradigm changing episode. And stop using the term “urinary tract infection” unless it’s prefaced by air quotes! Sponsor: Join ACP's Internal Medicine Meeting 2019 April 11-13th in Philadelphia, PA . We'll see you there! Full show notes available at http://thecurbsiders.com/podcast. Join our mailing list and receive a PDF copy of our show notes every Monday. Rate us on iTunes, recommend a guest or topic and give feedback at thecurbsiders@gmail.com. Credits Written and produced by: Matthew Watto MD Hosts: Matthew Watto MD, Paul Williams MD Edited by: Matthew Watto MD Guest: Tom Finucane MD, MACP Time Stamps 00:00 Disclaimer, intro and guest bio 04:00 Guest one liner, book recommendation, career advice 08:22 The “medical ignorome” 13:40 ACP Internal Medicine Meeting 2019 details 16:20 Case of malodorous urine; Urine is NOT sterile; Defining terms 25:14 Stop saying UTI unless using air quotes 28:34 What symptoms or history matters in evaluation for “UTI”? And can we predict who will become systemically ill? 34:47 Voltaire and when treatment is warranted for “urinary tract infections” 37:15 Delirium in an older adult with possible UTI, how to work it up, and who warrants antibiotics 51:55 Take home points 53:38 Outro

01.07.2019

2018 Recap Extravaganza

Take a trip down memory lane with top clinical pearls and favorite moments from The Curbsiders in 2018. Welcome to our 2018 Recap Extravaganza! Since last year, the Curbsiders team has grown substantially and the podcast has undergone several exciting developments. These include our collaboration with ACP that allows us to provide CME and MOC credit for select episodes, our new partnership with Human Dx as featured in our Kashlak Morning Reports, and the launch of our Women in Medicine series. For our 2017 year-end show, we had listeners vote for their favorite episodes from the past year. This year, we're changing it up a bit and have invited our Curbsider colleagues to share their picks for pearliest pearls and most illuminating episodes of 2018. We hope you’ll enjoy hearing the team’s highlights, and we’ll be back in 2019 with fresh content. Note: No CME-MOC credit for this episode, but stay tuned in 2019 for eligible episodes. Full show notes available at http://thecurbsiders.com/podcast. Join our mailing list and receive a PDF copy of our show notes every Monday. Rate us on iTunes, recommend a guest or topic and give feedback at thecurbsiders@gmail.com. Credits Written and produced by: Chris Chiu MD and Sarah Phoebe Roberts, MPH Hosts: Matthew Watto MD, Paul Williams MD, Stuart Brigham MD, Chris Chiu MD Edited by: Chris Chiu MD Time Stamps 00:00 Disclaimer, Intro 06:39 Clinical Reasoning Pearls 12:35 Pulmonary Hypertension Pearls 15:52 Women In Medicine Pearls 20:40 Iron Deficiency Pearls 24:52 Tick-Borne Illness Pearls 28:00 STI Pearls 31:00 Physical Exam Pearls 32:51 “Things we do for no reason” Pearls 36:16 Host Picks 42:38 Paul Wraps-up the Year 43:38 Outro and Curbsider Team sign-offs

12.31.2018
12.24.2018
12.19.2018

#131 A Case of Cough and Dyspnea

Hone your diagnostic skills with this mystery case of cough and dyspnea http://hdx.org/pdp (click link to follow along). The Curbsiders deconstruct the case and discuss their diagnostic schemas for these common problems with the help of returning guest, Reza Manesh MD, editor of Global Morning Report at The Human Diagnosis Project aka Human Dx. Use this link http://hdx.org/pdp to follow along with the case on the Human Dx app or website and check out more Global Morning Report cases. Full show notes available at http://thecurbsiders.com/podcast. Join our mailing list and receive a PDF copy of our show notes every Monday. Rate us on iTunes, recommend a guest or topic and give feedback at thecurbsiders@gmail.com. Credits Written and produced by: Hannah R Abrams Hosts: Matthew Watto MD, Paul Williams MD, Stuart Brigham MD Edited by: Matthew Watto MD Guest: Reza Manesh MD Special thanks to: Steph Sherman, Zaven Sargsyan, Anand Jagannath, John Inou Hwang, and Rabih Geha for contributing and editing the cases; and to Tyler Brandon for helping to coordinate these wonderful episodes. Time Stamps 00:00 Announcement, disclaimer, intro, guest bio 03:13 When and how to practice clinical reasoning 05:53 Creating diagnostic schemas and Clinical Problem Solvers Podcast 09:40 A bit on Human Dx and the show format 12:00 Case of a 40 yo male with a cough 23:22 Some insights from Reza on “signal versus noise” 37:10 Case conclusion/answer, cognitive autopsy and Reza’s take home points 45:36 Outro

12.17.2018

#130 Work-Life Fit: Women In Medicine

Create a successful partnership and career withs tips from Wonder Woman, Sue Hingle MD of ACP.  Work-Life Balance: is it a myth, or attainable if we could just find the right fit? In this episode, we chat with Dr. Susan Hingle about identifying our work-life priorities and re-evaluating these priorities throughout our lives. We strategize about achieving personal and professional goals (pro tip: stop worrying about what others think!). Dr. Hingle is Professor in the Department of Internal Medicine and Vice Chair of Education and Faculty Development and Associate Internal Medicine Residency Program Director at Southern Illinois University. She is also the Immediate Past Chair of the Board of Regents of the American College of Physicians (ACP). She has served at the ACP in a variety of ways, including as a member of the ACP Women’s Task Force. Her clinical expertise is in women’s health, health promotion, and disease prevention. Enjoy the episode! ACP members can visit https://acponline.org/curbsiders to claim free CME-MOC credit for this episode and show notes (goes live 0900 EST). Full show notes available at http://thecurbsiders.com/podcast. Rate us on iTunes, recommend a guest or topic and give feedback at thecurbsiders@gmail.com. Credits Written and produced by: Nora Taranto MS4, Shreya Trivedi MD, Leah Witt MD, Sarah P. Roberts MPH. CME Questions by: Shreya Trivedi MD Editors: Matthew Watto MD and Chris Chiu MD Hosts: Shreya Trivedi MD, Paul Williams MD, Leah Witt MD Guest: Susan Hingle MD Time Stamps 00:00 Disclaimer, intro and guest bio 02:52 Guest one liner, WIM Moment of awakening, advice for her younger self 07:45 Picks of the week 10:30 Physician with family and caregiver responsibility; How to plan for personal and professional goals 18:20 What to look for in a partner, how to work with them to achieve work life fit, and non-traditional roles 28:35 Advice on family planning 31:40 Residency programs and life events 32:55 Should you go part-time? 39:43 Work life balance? Or work life fit? And some examples/tips for success 49:54 Take home points 50:45 Outro 52:22 Bonus story

12.13.2018

#129 Depression and Suicide: Occupational Hazards of Practicing Medicine

Dr Elisabeth Poorman MD joins us to discuss the natural history of physician depression in residency and beyond. We share some of our own personal stories, and discuss how we can support one another and reach out for help, how to take care of our mental health in an emotionally demanding career, how to deal with licensing questions and worry about stigma, and what systemic changes may be coming (read: we think need to be coming) down the line. The problem of depression and suicide is a particularly real one in medicine, a profession that is, by its very nature traumatic and emotionally draining (both in terms of work demands and also the sick and dying patients we treat). N.b. This is a sensitive topic. If this is triggering for anyone listening, the national suicide hotline number 1-800-273-8255. Moreover, if anyone needs or wants guidance on available resources, Dr. Elisabeth Poorman has made herself available either via email, private msg on FB or twitter (@DrPoorman), or any of us on twitter. We are happy to talk and see that you get support you need. Full show notes available at http://thecurbsiders.com/podcast. Join our mailing list and receive a PDF copy of our show notes every Monday. Rate us on iTunes, recommend a guest or topic and give feedback at thecurbsiders@gmail.com. Credits Written and produced by: Nora Taranto MS4, Shreya Trivedi MD Hosts: Stuart Brigham MD, Shreya Trivedi MD, Matthew Watto MD Edited by: Matthew Watto MD Guest: Elisabeth Poorman, MD Time Stamps 00:00 Disclaimer, Intro, Guest Bio 3:25 Wellness Recommendations: Find a Therapist 6:12 How to find a therapist in training 6:39 Licensing and Mental Health 12:14 Disclaimer and Trigger Warning: Stories are Sensitive. National suicide hotline info Next, Dr Poorman and each of The Curbsiders share their personal experiences with mental health (see below). 12:05 Shreya story 21:40 Stuart’s story 31:19 Elisabeth’s story 36:17 Watto’s story 37:41 Passive suicidal ideaiton, a definition   41:10 Suicide and Depression: Do they always coexist? (No) 42:20 Life Cycle of Depression and Suicide in the Medical Profession 47:15 Depression and Suicide in Primary Care 47:59 Mini-Cases 54:00 Noticing signs in a colleague: how to help 58:00 Specific programs doing things well 1:03:08: Questions from Social Media 1:03:10: Burnout vs. Depression 1:04:27: Will getting treatment affect your board applications 1:06:14 Take home points 1:08:00 Outro

12.10.2018

#128 Aspirin Overhyped and Overused

Aspirin’ to figure out if ASA can help prevent a heart attack? Interpreting all the new trials doesn’t have to cause chest pain! Join Dr. Ambarish Pandey from UT Southwestern as he helps The Curbsiders ASCEND the mountains of the latest studies to ARRIVE at some well-informed conclusions on the role of aspirin in primary prevention for cardiac events. The team also discusses secondary prevention, aspirin and dual (or triple) antiplatelet therapy, and whether it’s okay to stop giving aspirin to older adults without known CAD (Spoiler alert: it’s okay). ACP members can visit https://acponline.org/curbsiders to claim free CME-MOC credit for this episode and show notes (goes live 0900 EST). Full show notes available at http://thecurbsiders.com/podcast. Join our mailing list and receive a PDF copy of our show notes every Monday. Rate us on iTunes, recommend a guest or topic and give feedback at thecurbsiders@gmail.com. Credits Written and produced by: Justin Berk MD, Matthew Watto MD CME questions by: Justin Berk MD Hosts: Matthew Watto MD, Paul Williams MD, Stuart Brigham MD Edited by: Matthew Watto MD and Chris Chiu MD Guest: Dr. Ambarish Pandey MD Time Stamps 00:00 Disclaimer, intro and guest bio 04:15 Guest one liner, book recommendation, career and research advice 11:07 Case of aspirin for primary prevention, aspirin’s public persona, and nocebo effects of statins 21:40 ARRIVE and ASCEND trials 28:14 Aspree trial 32:38 Coronary artery calcium; aspirin use for secondary prevention 37:42 Dual antiplatelet therapy and the DAPT score 41:25 Should we continue aspirin when a patient also needs a DOAC? 46:14 Should we continue DAPT in a patient who needs a DOAC (or warfarin)? 49:40 Deprescribing aspirin for primary prevention in older adults? 50:51 Closing remarks 52:33 Outro

12.03.2018

Hotcakes: Exercise, Aspirin, Fish Oil and Hypertension

Tony Breu MD joins us for some hotcakes, and “cold cakes” including: how aspirin and zodiac sign affect the treatment of acute MI, a recent study on how exercise is probably still good for you, the recently announced REDUCE-IT trial, and the evidence (or lack thereof) for the treatment of hypertensive urgency. Welcome to another edition of Hotcakes and Hot Takes, where we discuss the most interesting articles and news that we have been reading. Special guest is the prolific Dr. Tony Breu (@tony_breu) who is an Assistant Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School and a Hospitalist and Director of Internal Medicine Resident Education at the VA Boston Healthcare System. He is known for his series on "Things We Do For No Reason” as well as his thought-provoking “Tweetorials” online. ACP members can visit https://acponline.org/curbsiders to claim free CME-MOC credit for this episode and show notes (goes live 0900 EST on day of release). Full show notes available at http://thecurbsiders.com/podcast. Rate us on iTunes, recommend a guest or topic and give feedback at thecurbsiders@gmail.com. Credits Written and Produced by: Sarah Phoebe Roberts MPH, Christopher Chiu MD CME Questions: Christopher Chiu MD Hosts: Matthew Watto MD, Stuart Brigham MD, Paul Williams MD, and Christopher Chiu MD Guest Presenter and Content Planning: Anthony Breu MD Editor: Christopher Chiu MD Cover-Art: Christopher Chiu MD Time stamps 00:00 Disclaimer, intro, guest bio 05:53 Discussion on Tweetorials 08:00 Cold Cake: ISIS-2 and the treatment of acute MI with aspirin 14:04 ISIS-2 and zodiac subgroup analysis 16:19 What is the relationship between cardiorespiratory fitness on mortality? 24:40 Discussion of the REDUCE-IT study 33:00 Cold Cake: VA Cooperative study and the evidence for treating essential hypertension 36:42 TWDFNR and the treatment of hypertensive urgency 46:36 Wrap-up and outro

11.29.2018

#127 STIs: Syphilis, Gonorrhea and Chlamydia

Master the diagnosis and management of common STIs (sexually transmitted infections) with tips from expert, Dana Dunne MD, Associate Professor of Medicine in Infectious Diseases at Yale. Topics include: the stages and many presentations of syphilis, syphilis treatment and counseling, the natural history, diagnosis, and screening guidelines for gonorrhea and chlamydia, treatment options in the age of growing resistance, and a discussion of partner notification and treatment. Full show notes available at http://thecurbsiders.com/podcast. Rate us on iTunes, recommend a guest or topic and give feedback at thecurbsiders@gmail.com. Credits Written and produced by: Bryan Brown MD Hosts: Bryan Brown MD, Paul Williams MD, Matthew Watto MD Guest: Dana Dunne MD Special thanks to Kate Grant MBChB, Dip GUMed for her contribution of knowledge and artwork. Time Stamps 00:00 Announcement, disclaimer, intro and guest bio 04:29 Guest onliner, book recommendation, advice for learners/teacher, and picks of the week 11:00 A case of syphilis, clinical manifestations and discussion of the stages 26:05 Testing for syphilis 39:05 Mandatory reporting and partner tracing 42:40 Counseling patients with syphilis 44:44 A case of gonorrhea and chlamydia, clinical manifestations, screening guidelines 52:30 How to counsel patients to obtain samples from urethra, rectum, vagina, oropharynx; Mycoplasma genitalium 59:40 CDC treatment guidelines, Super gonorrhea, test of cure, and treatment of partners 72:35 Take home points 74:30 Outro

11.26.2018
11.19.2018

#125 Hidden Curriculum

Check out this audio treasure map to find the hidden curriculum and learn how it can change your practice. Learn how positive teaching spans not just the classroom or bedside but, how we simply talk about patients. Sanjay Desai MD, coauthor of ACP’s Position Paper on Hidden Curriculum and Internal Medicine program director at Johns Hopkins guides us through several cases that illustrate how our institutional norms can shape the practice of medicine...for better or worse. ACP members can visit https://acponline.org/curbsiders to claim free CME-MOC credit for this episode and show notes (goes live 0900 EST). Full show notes available at http://thecurbsiders.com/podcast. Join our mailing list and receive a PDF copy of our show notes every Monday. Rate us on iTunes, recommend a guest or topic and give feedback at thecurbsiders@gmail.com. Credits Written and produced by: Sanjay Desai MD; Justin Berk MD, MPH, MBA; Matthew Watto MD CME questions by: Justin Berk MD Editors: Chris Chiu MD & Matthew Watto MD Hosts: Justin Berk MD, MPH, MBA; Matthew Watto MD; Paul Williams MD Guest: Sanjay Desai MD Time Stamps 00:00 Disclaimer, Intro and guest bio 04:00 Guest one liner, book recommendations, career advice 10:50 Intro to the hidden curriculum and ACP’s three recommendations 22:00 Case #1: A patient with schizophrenia 32:10 Case #2: The iPatient 38:07 Case #3: Attending forgets to wash their hands 41:10 Case #4: A dying patient’s primary care doctor saves the day 46:26 Case #5: A case of violating duty hours 60:10 Take home points 62:00 Outro

11.15.2018
11.12.2018

#123 Sleep Apnea Pearls and Pitfalls

The sleep apnea episode that won’t put you to sleep. Become a sleep apnea guru with incredible insights from Barbara Phillips MD, MSPH, FCCP an expert in pulmonary medicine, critical care and sleep medicine who is also a past president of CHEST! We discuss high-yield topics in the world of obstructive sleep apnea including: home sleep studies vs in-lab polysomnography, the importance of oxygen saturation (the T90 and ODI) when interpreting sleep study results, tricks to improve CPAP adherence, and alternatives therapies for obstructive sleep apnea. ACP members can visit https://acponline.org/curbsiders to claim free CME-MOC credit for this episode and show notes. Full show notes available at http://thecurbsiders.com/podcast. Rate us on iTunes, recommend a guest or topic and give feedback at thecurbsiders@gmail.com. Credits Written and produced by: Cyrus Askin MD CME questions by: Cyrus Askin MD Editor: Chris Chiu MD & Matthew Watto MD Hosts: Cyrus Askin MD & Matthew Watto MD Guest: Barbara Phillips, MD Cover-Art & Infographic - Beth Garbitelli, MS1 Time Stamps 00:00 Disclaimer, intro, guest bio 03:00 Guest one liner, book recommendation, advice for trainees 08:10 Clinical case of sleep apnea, some basic stats, and key predictors of sleep apnea 12:38 Barriers to diagnosis and treatment of OSA 15:23 Discussion of T90, hypoxemia and sleep fragmentation 17:05 How to read a sleep study report 21:55 Home sleep apnea testing 24:15 What are the consequences of sleep apnea 28:30 What is the efficacy of cpap for lowering blood pressure and mortality 31:45 Counseling a patient who is new to cpap 33:45 Choice of mask 40:10 Do alternatives to cpap work? e.g. surgery, mandibular advancement devices 44:17 Modafinil and z-drugs 47:15 Driver’s license issues in sleep apnea 48:35 Future of sleep medicine and take home points 51:15 Outro

11.05.2018

#122 Headaches Advanced Class

We delve into advanced management of headaches, including novel therapies, migraines with aura, migraines in complicated patients, and headaches of short duration with Dr. Rebecca Burch, a headache medicine specialist at the John R. Graham Headache Center at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. Full show notes available at http://thecurbsiders.com/podcast. Rate us on iTunes, recommend a guest or topic and give feedback at thecurbsiders@gmail.com. Credits Written and produced by: Paul Williams MD Edited by: Matthew Watto MD Hosts: Paul Williams MD, Stuart Brigham MD, Matthew Watto MD Guest: Rebecca Burch MD Time Stamps 00:00 Disclaimer, intro and guest bio 03:28 Guest one-liner, movie and podcast recommendations, favorite failure and picks of the week from The Curbsiders 10:38 Clinical case of migraines; diagnosis and classification 14:12 Does medication overuse headache exist? 16:16 Chronic daily headache; Conversion from episodic to chronic and vice versa 21:43 Approaches to medication overuse headache 25:54 Case 2: migraine with aura and other types of migraine (retinal, hemiplegic, etc.) 32:09 Pathophysiology of migraine; how triptans work; How should aura effect management? 38:44 Migraine cocktails 41:15 Comorbid mood disorders; Use of psych meds and triptans 45:08 Migraines and oral contraceptives 48:42 Botulinum toxin and new CGRP therapies 53:36 What does success look like in migraine therapy? 55:32 Nonpharmacologic management 60:45 Case 3: headaches of short duration 66:36 Headache red flags; Imaging for headaches; pathophysiology of high and low pressure headaches 72:00 Idiopathic intracranial hypertension 75:25 Take home points 77:00 Outro  

10.29.2018

#121 HIV Care for the Internist

HIV care for the internist with author and HIV expert, Michael Saag MD, Professor of Infectious Diseases at University of Alabama and founder of the 1917 Clinic. We discuss the specifics of screening & diagnostic testing in HIV, monitoring CD4 counts and viral loads, first line antiretroviral therapy, harm reduction, and how to provide excellent HIV care in your primary care clinic. Full show notes available at http://thecurbsiders.com/podcast. Join our mailing list and receive a PDF copy of our show notes every Monday. Rate us on iTunes, recommend a guest or topic and give feedback at thecurbsiders@gmail.com. Credits Written & Produced by: Elena Gibson MS4, Justin Berk MD MBA MPH Artwork by: Elena Gibson MS4 Hosts: Matthew Watto MD, Paul Williams MD, Justin Berk MD MBA MPH Editor: Matthew Watto MD Guest: Michael Saag MD Time Stamps 00:00 Disclaimer, intro, and guest bio 04:35 Getting to know our guest, a movie recommendation, and words of wisdom 08:48 Clinical case, HIV screening, in-depth discussion of HIV testing & diagnosis 15:56 New diagnosis of HIV, counseling after diagnosis, confirmation, follow-up testing, the second visit 24:20 Treatment - what to start and when; some basic comments on therapy 30:05 Primary care after diagnosis, vaccines, cancer screening, cardiovascular disease prevention 34:35 Monitoring CD4 counts and viral load; interpreting CD4 count; time course of response for CD4 and viral load 42:02 Harm reduction counseling; addressing medication non-adherence 47:40 PCP prophylaxis 49:43 The 1917 Clinic, Ryan White Clinics, and linking patients to care 53:10 Take home points 55:40 Plugs 57:45 Will a cure or vaccine for HIV emerge? 59:16 Outro

10.22.2018
10.19.2018

#119 Nutrition Pearls, Heart Health and Bacon

Nutrition pearls from integrative cardiologist, Steven Devries MD, Associate Professor of Medicine, Northwestern Feinberg School of Medicine, Executive Director of The Gaples Institute. Clinicians receive little formal nutritional training in medical school and residency. It’s time to fill that gap! We discuss the strength of the literature supporting dietary interventions for cardiovascular health and review practical tips to help patients achieve healthy eating patterns. Patients need to hear from us that nutrition matters! Full show notes available at http://thecurbsiders.com/podcast. Join our mailing list and receive a PDF copy of our show notes every Monday. Rate us on iTunes, recommend a guest or topic and give feedback at thecurbsiders@gmail.com. Credits Written & Produced by: Molly Heublein MD Hosts: Matthew Watto MD, Paul Williams MD, Molly Heublein MD Guest: Stephen Devries MD Editor: Matthew Watto MD Special thanks to Elena Gibson MS4 for writing our show notes Time Stamps 00:00 Disclaimer 00:35 Intro and guest bio 02:40 Guest one-liner, book recommendation, favorite failure, nontraditional career path 10:10 Nutrition and medical education 12:45 Evidence for how nutrition can improve health outcomes 15:33 How to describe a heart healthy or Mediterranean diet to patients 25:16 Discussion of fats and oils 31:44 Food deserts, healthy snacking options 37:15 Calorie counting and use of healthy eating apps 40:55 How to frame the discussion about a healthful eating pattern with patients 47:18 Macronutrient content. Does it matter? 52:50 Intermittent fasting 54:24 A free resource for patients to learn about nutrition  

10.15.2018

#118 Female Sexual Problems with Stacy Lindau MD

Houston, we have a female sexual dysfunction problem. Female sexual problems, which can affect women of all ages, are underdiagnosed and undertreated--in part because clinicians are not the best at asking about sex in primary care visits. In the course of this episode, learn about how to have that sex talk you’ve (maybe) been avoiding, what to ask when working up sexual problems in women, and find the words to talk to patients about sex. Today, we’re lucky to have the female sexual health expert of experts, Dr. Stacy Lindau, MD, MA, Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Medicine-Geriatrics at the University of Chicago Medicine, on the show to teach us the best “sex talk” language, the differential for female sexual problems, and explore therapies. Sadly, there’s no sildenafil-like magic bullet, but a multidisciplinary team can make real impact on female sexual problems. Don’t forget to check out http://womanlab.org Full show notes available at http://thecurbsiders.com/podcast. Rate us on iTunes, recommend a guest or topic and give feedback at thecurbsiders@gmail.com. Credits Written and produced by: Nora Taranto MS4 Hosts: Leah Witt MD and Matthew Watto MD Infographic: Leah Witt MD Editor: Matthew Watto MD Guest: Stacy Lindau MD Time Stamps 00:00 Disclaimer 00:35 Intro and guest bio 03:30 Guest one liner, book recommendations, favorite failure, career advice and picks of the week 12:57 Clinical Case of female sexual dysfunction and some definitions 15:08 Are sexual problems a normal part of aging?; How to take a sexual history; Etiology of sexual dysfunction; “Diagnostic sex”; Red flags 27:54 Medications that contribute to sexual dysfunction 31:00 Labs 34:45 Treatment: pelvic PT, medications, counseling, flibanserin, herbal supplements 49:05 Screening for female sexual problems 51:58 Take home points; WomanLab.org 55:19 Outro Tags sexual dysfunction, female, gynecologist, ob-gyn, female sexual disorder, libido, sex, hormones, care, doctor, education, family, FOAM, FOAMim, FOAMed, health, hospitalist, hospital, internal, internist, meded, medical, medicine, nurse, practitioner, professional, primary, physician, resident, student

10.08.2018

#117 Clostridium Difficile: IDSA Guidelines, Bad Puns, and Random Pearls

Summary Conquer Clostridium difficile (Clostridioides difficile) with this “spore-tacular” episode featuring infectious diseases expert, Dr. Curtis Donskey, Professor at Case Western Reserve University and clinician at the Louis Stokes VA Hospital. We discuss the updates in the 2017 IDSA C. difficile guidelines plus a bunch of random pearls. If you have ever laid awake at night wondering how many pills are needed for a fecal transplant, then this is the episode for you!  We discuss why metronidazole was dropped as the first line therapy for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) along with other hot topics such as two-step testing, loperamide use, which antibiotics are the least likely to cause CDI, and more. Do not miss this episode! Full show notes available at http://thecurbsiders.com/podcast. Join our mailing list and receive a PDF copy of our show notes every Monday. Rate us on iTunes, recommend a guest or topic and give feedback at thecurbsiders@gmail.com. Credits Written by: Carolyn Chan MD Produced by: Matthew Watto MD Hosts: Carolyn Chan MD, Matthew Watto MD, Paul Williams MD Editor: Matthew Watto MD Guest: Curtis Donskey, MD Time Stamps 00:00 Intro, disclaimer, guest bio 02:19 Getting to know our guest, recommendations for reading, career advice 06:40 Clinical case and CDI testing 09:30 Testing for CDI: PCR and Two step testing 16:30 Testing after treatment 20:00 Treatment of initial CDI episodes, metronidazole pharmacokinetics 24:15 Classification of CDI severity 29:30 Fidaxomicin pearls: when to use, cost, and tapers 34:10 Vancomycin tapers 36:05 Fecal transplant pearls: freeze dried capsules, c-scopes, treating fulminant CDI 44:44 Infection control: counseling homegoing patients, hand washing, and baths 47:50 Social media questions: immodium and toxic megacolon, antibiotics less likely to promote CDI, probiotics, and more! 59:14 Best CDI joke in the history of time 60:00 Take home points 62:42 Outro Tags Clostridium, difficile, cdi, C.Diff, infectious, diseases, diarrhea, IDSA, guideline, antibiotics, vancomycin, fidaxomicin, fmt, transplant, fecal, stool, toxin, assistant, care, doctor, education, family, FOAM, FOAMim, FOAMed, health, hospitalist, hospital, internal, internist, meded, medical, medicine, nurse, practitioner, professional, primary, physician, resident, student

10.01.2018

#116 Geriatric Psychiatry: Sleep, Dementia, and Behavioral Disturbances

Geriatric psychiatry returns. We tackle sleep problems and behavioral disturbances in patients with dementia with returning guest, and Geriatric Psychiatrist Dennis Popeo MD, Clinical Associate Professor of Psychiatry at NYU Langone Medical Center. Topics include: pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic management of insomnia; treating agitation and irritability; medical management of psychotic symptoms and paranoia; ethical concerns about the treatment of challenging behaviors in dementia; and the shortage of geriatricians and geriatric psychiatrists. Full show notes available at http://thecurbsiders.com/podcast. Join our mailing list and receive a PDF copy of our show notes every Monday. Rate us on iTunes, recommend a guest or topic and give feedback at thecurbsiders@gmail.com. Credits Written & Produced by: Jordana Kozupsky NP, Matthew Watto MD Artwork by: Kate Grant MD Hosts: Jordana Kozupsky NP, Matthew Watto MD Editor: Matthew Watto MD Guest: Dennis Popeo, MD Time Stamps 00:00 Intro and guest bio 01:55 Case of sleep disturbance in a patient with dementia; medications for sleep disturbances; nonpharmacologic strategies for sleep 11:32 Irritability and agitation versus paranoia, or psychotic symptoms; benzodiazepines in older adults 15:40 Antipsychotic medications, the black box warning and ethical concerns 23:50 Geriatricians, geriatric psychiatrists in short supply; Behavioral interventions 28:16 Outro Tags psychiatry, psych, geri, geriatrics, dementia, paranoia, psychosis, sleep, insomnia, agitation, antipsychotics, atypical, black, box, warning, adverse, zolpidem, benzodiazepine, side, effects, therapy, mirtazapine, gabapentin, assistant, care, doctor, education, family, FOAM, FOAMim, FOAMed, health, hospitalist, hospital, internal, internist, meded, medical, medicine, nurse, practitioner, professional, primary, physician, resident, student

09.27.2018

#115 Geriatric Depression

Summary Geriatric depression got you down? Boost your spirits with tips and tactics from Geriatric Psychiatrist, Dennis Popeo MD, Clinical Associate Professor of Psychiatry at NYU Langone Medical Center. Topics include: suicide in the older adults; how to diagnosis depression in older adults; how to counsel patients about antidepressants, how to choose an antidepressant, how to monitor and titrate medications, and how long to continue therapy. Stay tuned for part two of our discussion with Dr Popeo on managing sleep and behavioral problems in older adult patients with dementia. Full show notes available at http://thecurbsiders.com/podcast. Join our mailing list and receive a PDF copy of our show notes every Monday. Rate us on iTunes, recommend a guest or topic and give feedback at thecurbsiders@gmail.com. Credits Written & Produced by: Jordana Kozupsky NP, Matthew Watto MD Artwork by: Kate Grant MD Hosts: Jordana Kozupsky NP, Matthew Watto MD Editor: Matthew Watto MD Guest: Dennis Popeo, MD Time Stamps 00:00 A question for you, the listeners 01:12 Disclaimer, intro and guest bio 05:00 Getting to know our guest, recommendations for reading, and career advice 14:13 Case of geriatric depression; effective history taking; recognizing associated symptoms; depression scales 19:03 Suicide in older adults; firearm safety 24:26 Choice of therapy; Pharmacologic agents; Counseling patients and managing expectations; Dose titration and tracking symptoms 34:41 Augmenting therapy versus cross-titration to another agent; When is it okay to stop an antidepressant 40:50 Take home points 44:40 Outro Tags: psychiatry, psych, geri, geriatrics, depression, mdd, sleep, insomnia, appetite, agitation, suicide, SSRIs, side, effects, therapy, diagnosis, serotonin, mirtazapine, bupropion, assistant, care, doctor, education, family, FOAM, FOAMim, FOAMed, health, hospitalist, hospital, internal, internist, meded, medical, medicine, nurse, practitioner, professional, primary, physician, resident, student

09.24.2018

#114 High Value Care: Assess Quality, Mitigate Diagnostic Uncertainty, Overcome Barriers

Kick up the quality of your care with tips and tactics from Caitlin Clancy MD, coauthor of ACP’s High Value Care Curriculum. We learn to define quality and value in healthcare; the most common barriers to high value care; use of probability and likelihood ratios to boost clinical reasoning and combat diagnostic uncertainty; some useful tools to estimate cost; sources of healthcare waste; and some general pearls on how the healthcare system works...or doesn’t. ACP members can claim free CME-MOC at acponline.com/curbsiders (goes live 0900 EST on podcast release date). Full show notes available at http://thecurbsiders.com/podcast. Join our mailing list and receive a PDF copy of our show notes every Monday. Rate us on iTunes, recommend a guest or topic and give feedback at thecurbsiders@gmail.com. Credits: Written & Produced by: Matthew Watto MD Hosts: Paul Williams MD, Stuart Brigham MD, Matthew Watto MD Guest: Caitlin Clancy MD Time Stamps 00:00 Disclaimer, intro and guest bio 03:50 Guest one-liner, some discussion on non traditional paths, and picks of the week 12:10 Case 1: Defining value, cost, quality; sources of healthcare waste; and how to avoid the waste of daily labs 23:00 Case 2: An uninsured patient who needs major surgery; costs for uninsured versus insured patients 28:35 Do insured patients have better outcomes? 31:15 How to determine cost and “fair market price” 36:29 Case 3: Clinical case of suspected heart failure 45:45 Case 4: Clinical case of patient requesting antibiotics; barriers to high value care and how to overcome them 57:05 Outro Tags: high, value, care, quality, cost, diagnostic, uncertainty, likelihood, ratio, testing, treatment, consumer, acp, college, american, insured, uninsured, bill, charge, reimbursement, assistant, care, doctor, education, family, FOAM, FOAMim, FOAMed, health, hospitalist, hospital, internal, internist, meded, medical, medicine, nurse, practitioner, professional, primary, physician, resident, student

09.17.2018

#113 Gout: Uric acid targets, urate lowering therapy, and random questions from social media

Master the management of gout with tips from expert, Tuhina Neogi MD, PhD, Professor of Medicine at Boston University School of Medicine. Topics include: how to initiate and titrate urate lowering therapy, guidelines controversy over uric acid targets, colchicine & NSAIDS for anti-inflammatory prophylaxis, uricosuric agents, febuxostat, HLA B5801, use of uric acid levels in the acute setting and more random gout facts. Full show notes available at http://thecurbsiders.com/podcast. Join our mailing list and receive a PDF copy of our show notes every Monday. Rate us on iTunes, recommend a guest or topic and give feedback at thecurbsiders@gmail.com. Credits: Written and produced by: Matthew Watto MD Hosts: Paul Williams MD, Stuart Brigham MD, Matthew Watto MD Guest: Tuhina Neogi MD, PhD Time Stamps 00:00 Intro and guest bio 01:30 Allopurinol initiation and titration 07:10 Uricosuric therapy 09:10 Controversy over uric acid targets for gout 17:40 Parachutes and randomized controlled trials 19:15 Colchicine or NSAIDS for prophylaxis 23:20 Who needs febuxostat? 26:20 When to refer for gout, HLA B5801, and checking uric acid levels in the acute setting   33:29 Take home points 36:15 Outro Tags: allopurinol, uric, urate, acid, level, therapy, management, gout, flare, crystal, arthritis, titration, probenecid, febuxostat, target, acr, acp, guidelines, nsaids, colchicine, hla b5801, septic, rheumatology, assistant, care, doctor, education, family, FOAM, FOAMim, FOAMed, health, hospitalist, hospital, internal, internist, meded, medical, medicine, nurse, practitioner, professional, primary, physician, resident, student

09.10.2018

#112 Gout Flares: Bathtubs and Firefighting

Crystalize your knowledge of gout and stop flares in their tracks with tips from expert, Tuhina Neogi MD, PhD, Professor of Medicine at Boston University School of Medicine. On this first of two gout episodes we learn to diagnose gout with or without arthrocentesis, how to treat flares, and how to counsel patients about gout, which apparently involves fire fighting and bathtubs. Don’t miss next week’s episode on urate lowering therapy, gout guidelines controversy, and answers to your gout questions from social media. Full show notes available at http://thecurbsiders.com/podcast. Join our mailing list and receive a PDF copy of our show notes every Monday. Rate us on iTunes, recommend a guest or topic and give feedback at thecurbsiders@gmail.com. Credits: Written and produced by: Matthew Watto MD Hosts: Paul Williams MD, Stuart Brigham MD, Matthew Watto MD Guest: Tuhina Neogi MD, PhD Time Stamps 00:00 Disclaimer, intro 01:40 Guest bio 03:20 Guest one liner, music recommendations, advice for researchers, and some comments on failure 09:15 Clinical diagnosis of gout 12:15 Is taking a diet history useful? 14:30 Classification criteria for gout 17:35 MSK ultrasound and Physical exam findings in gout 21:06 Arthrocentesis and MSU crystals 24:45 A recap of how to make the diagnosis of gout 26:50 The bathtub analogy and how to counsel a patient with a new diagnosis of gout 30:55 Pathophysiology of gout 34:55 Treatment for acute gout flares (steroids, colchicine, NSAIDS. And topical NSAIDS?)  45:30 Outro Tags: gout, crystal, colchicine, steroids, nsaids, joint, flare, acute, chronic, urate, uric, acid, arthritis, acr, exam, diagnosis, rheumatology, assistant, care, doctor, education, family, FOAM, FOAMim, FOAMed, health, hospitalist, hospital, internal, internist, meded, medical, medicine, nurse, practitioner, professional, primary, physician, resident, student

09.03.2018

#111: Hotcakes - Complementary Medicine in Cancer, Dosing Aspirin by Body Weight, Marijuana & Respiratory Symptoms, Penicillin Allergies and More!

Dr. Neda Frayha (@nedafrayha) of Primary Care RAP (Hippo Education) joins us this month for our thoughts and analysis of some recent (and not so recent) journal articles that interested us this month. Our articles spanned topics that include at cancer survival among patients pursuing treatment with complementary medicine, the effect of body weight on effectiveness of preventive aspirin dosing, strategies to promote physician leadership, respiratory symptoms in those with marijuana use and MRSA risk among patients with penicillin allergies. ACP members can claim free CME-MOC at acponline.com/curbsiders (goes live 0900 EST on podcast release date). Full show notes available at http://thecurbsiders.com/podcast. Join our mailing list to receive a PDF copy of our show notes every Monday! And hey, while you’re here, consider rating us on iTunes and leaving a review. The Curbsiders thank you! Thoughts on the Journal Club series? Article or guest nominations? Compliments or complaints? You can reach us at thecurbsiders@gmail.com. We are also on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter: @thecurbsiders.   Credits: Written by: Sarah Phoebe Roberts MPH, Neda Frayha MD, Christopher Chiu MD Producers: Sarah Phoebe Roberts MPH, Christopher Chiu MD Hosts: Matthew Watto MD, Stuart Brigham MD, Paul Williams MD, and Christopher Chiu MD Editor: Matthew Watto MD  Time stamps: 00:00 Disclaimer, intro, guest bio 05:05 Do patients using complementary medicine for cancer therapy have worse outcomes? 13:11 Does low dose aspirin work for primary prevention of major adverse cardiac events? 19:16 Do physicians make better leaders? 24:55 Does marijuana cause respiratory symptoms? 30:40 Does penicillin allergy confer increased risk for C Diff and MRSA infection? 38:40 Wrap-up and outro Tags:​ aspirin, cardiac risk, mortality, cancer, complementary, alternative, conventional, therapy, marijuana, cannabis, respiratory, symptoms, leader, leadership, assistant, care, doctor, education, family, FOAM, FOAMim, FOAMed, health, hospitalist, hospital, internal, internist, meded, medical, medicine, nurse, practitioner, professional, primary, physician, resident, student

08.31.2018

#110: Driver’s safety for Older Adults: When is it Time to Give Up the Keys?

Get schooled on driver’s safety for older adults by expert, Alice Pomidor MD, Professor of Geriatrics at Florida State University. Whether or not older adults can continue to drive is a huge problem faced by for primary care clinicians, and will remain one until driverless cars become ubiquitous. Topics covered include: how to take a driving history, red flags, physical exam, cognitive exam, and vision assessment for driver’s safety, resources, when to refer, alternate means of transportation, and the legal repercussions of reporting...or not reporting. Full show notes available at http://thecurbsiders.com/podcast. Join our mailing list and receive a PDF copy of our show notes every Monday. Rate us on iTunes, recommend a guest or topic and give feedback at thecurbsiders@gmail.com. Credits: Written and produced by: Matthew Watto MD and Elizabeth Garbitelli MD Candidate 2022 Editor: Matthew Watto MD Cover Image by: Kate Grant MD Hosts: Matthew Watto MD, Stuart Brigham MD, Paul Williams MD Guest: Alice Pomidor MD  Time Stamps 00:00 Disclaimer 00:35 Intro and guest bio 03:10 Guest onliner, book recommendations, and career advice 10:43 Clinical case, and the 5 Rs of clinicians responsibility 19:15 Taking a history from older adult drivers 26:28 The clinical exam for driver’s safety (cognition, vision, and MSK tests) 37:24 How can we avoid patient anger towards clinician and family members? 41:10 When and where to refer for driving evaluation 47:00 Alternative transportation 52:00 What to do if someone refuses or forgets to stop driving 59:45 Reporting requirements and legal ramifications 69:15 Take home points 72:00 Outro  Tags: driving, elderly, geriatrics, dementia, treatment, prevention, cognition, seniors, drivers, safety, crash, motor, vehicle, car, assistant, care, doctor, education, family, FOAM, FOAMim, FOAMed, health, hospitalist, hospital, internal, internist, meded, medical, medicine, nurse, practitioner, professional, primary, physician, resident, student  

08.27.2018

#109: Things We Do For No Reason: A High Value Episode

Things We Do For No Reason #TWDFNR highlights some widespread practices that are difficult to justify based on lack of proven health benefits, but significant cost (both financial and non-financial harms). Avoid these low value practices and inflated medical bills with tips from expert, Dr Lenny Feldman, MD, FACP, Associate Professor of Medicine Johns Hopkins. Topics include: renal ultrasound and urine electrolytes in acute kidney injury (AKI), folate deficiency and anemia work-up, prealbumin and malnutrition, blood transfusions, shellfish and contrast allergies, monitoring after switch from IV or oral antibiotics, and “against medical advice” discharges. Don't forget to check out Clinicwiki.org a free, online resource for teaching ambulatory medicine. Full show notes available at http://thecurbsiders.com/podcast. Join our mailing list and receive a PDF copy of our show notes every Monday. Rate us on iTunes, recommend a guest or topic and give feedback at thecurbsiders@gmail.com.  Credits: Written and produced by: Justin Berk MD, MPH, MBA Editor: Matthew Watto, MD Hosts: Justin Berk MD, MPH, MBA; Matthew Watto MD; Paul Williams MD, FACP Guest: Lenny Feldman MD, FACP Goal: Listeners will recognize things we do for now reason aka low value practices with an unfavorable ratio of benefits to cost and/or harm. Learning objectives: After listening to this episode listeners will… Determine if renal ultrasound is indicated in acute kidney injury Recognize the limitations of urine electrolytes in AKI. Identify the shortcomings of folate testing. Explain the significance of low albumin and prealbumin. Identify patients at risk for serious allergic reactions from IV contrast administration Explain the futility in discharge Against Medical Advice (AMA) paperwork Counsel patients on harm reduction in “AMA” discharges Rationalize discharging patients immediately after switching from IV to  oral (PO) antibiotics. Time Stamps 00:00 Announcements 00:38 Disclaimer, intro, and guest bio 03:53 Guest one liner, some recommendations, and advice 08:35 Defining high value care and things we do for no reason (TWDFNR) 12:40 Why do clinicians order useless testing? 14:58 Urine electrolytes for acute kidney injury 20:30 Renal ultrasound for acute kidney injury 25:54 Stop ordering folate for anemia workup 31:47 How many units should I transfuse? 34:40 Prealbumin and albumin for malnourishment. 43:24 Iodine, shellfish and contrast allergy 50:28 Patient leaving against medical advice 56:45 Switching from IV to oral antibiotics 63:27 Dr Feldman’s plugs 65:36 Outro  Tags: high, value, choosing, wisely, acute, kidney, injury, renal, ultrasound, transfusion, AKI, malnutrition, folate, prealbumin, albumin contrast, allergy, antibiotics, AMA, TWDFNR, assistant, care, doctor, education, family, FOAM, FOAMim, FOAMed, health, hospitalist, hospital, internal, internist, meded, medical, medicine, nurse, practitioner, professional, primary, physician, resident, student

08.20.2018

#108: Point-of-care Ultrasound for the Internist

Point-of-care Ultrasound AKA POCUS ain’t no hocus. Dr. Renee Dversdal (@ReneeDversdal) Director of the Oregon Health & Science University Point of Care Ultrasound and General Medicine Ultrasound Fellowship Director, joins The Curbsiders to discuss her craft. Topics include: Defining POCUS, the value POCUS adds to the physical exam, training pathways and the appropriateness of billing. This episode is sponsored for CME-MOC credit by the American College of Physicians. ACP members can claim free credit at acponline.org/curbsiders (goes live at 9am on release date). Follow this link to read the ACP’s statement in support of POCUS in Internal Medicine. Full show notes available at http://thecurbsiders.com/podcast. Join our mailing list and receive a PDF copy of our show notes every Monday. Rate us on iTunes, recommend a guest or topic and give feedback at thecurbsiders@gmail.com. Credits: Written by: Christopher Chiu MD and Renee Dversdal MD Produced and CME questions by: Christopher Chiu MD Edited by: Matthew “Mike” Watto MD Hosts: Matthew Watto MD, Stuart Brigham MD, Christopher Chiu MD Guest Expert: Renee Dversdal MD Tags: point-of-care, acp, impocus, ultrasound, bedside, POCUS, CLUE, exam, training, lifestyle, management, assistant, care, doctor, education, family, FOAM, FOAMim, FOAMed, health, hospitalist, hospital, internal, internist, meded, medical, medicine, nurse, practitioner, professional, primary, physician, resident, student

08.13.2018

#107: Women in Medicine, Be Bold

“Women in medicine, be bold.” Medical World, powerful women are here to stay. Dr. Vineet (Vinny) Arora, Professor of Medicine at University of Chicago, an exemplary Woman in Medicine and Leadership, shares snippets of her own story, valuable career advice to folks at all levels of training, and fascinating data about the gender disparities that exist in training, promotion, and pay.  We hope you’ll learn from this episode, whether you have faced or anticipate facing these struggles as a Woman in Medicine or as a member of another marginalized group, or whether you’re an ally and want to learn more about the issue. Women are entering medical school now more than ever, and are learning to provide the best possible care to patients (didn’t you see that patients of female physicians have significantly lower mortality rates than patients of male physicians? (Tsugawa et al., 2016)).  The modern medical woman wants to teach, mentor, and lead--and be fairly evaluated, and promoted. That’s where We In Medicine (both women and men) have some work to do.  Because gender disparities (and other disparities hinging on identity) do exist. N.b. This episode is our inaugural in what we hope will be a Women in Medicine series for the Curbsiders.  We have many more topics with which we’d like to engage, from career trajectory to imposter syndrome to sexual harassment to balancing career and personal lives (as inequity is not only at work (Khullar. Being a Doctor is Hard. It’s Harder for Women. NYT 2017)), to conversations about race, gender, and LGBTQ identity in medicine.  We’re passionate, at The Curbsiders, about all these topics, and we want to dive deep into how to make Medicine a more welcoming and ceiling-less place for all.  We can’t wait to bring this series to you, not to mention to bring some more fabulous female experts on air. Full show notes available at http://thecurbsiders.com/podcast Join our mailing list and receive a PDF copy of our show notes every Monday. Rate us on iTunes, recommend a guest or topic and give feedback at thecurbsiders@gmail.com. Credits: Written and produced by: Leah Witt MD, Shreya P. Trivedi MD, Nora Taranto AB, Sarah Phoebe Roberts MPH, Molly Heublein MD, Beth Garbitelli, Hannah R Abrams, Images by: Beth Garbitelli and Hannah Abrams Editor: Matthew Watto MD Hosts: Leah Witt MD, Shreya P. Trivedi MD, Matthew Watto MD Guest: Vineet Arora MD Time Stamps 00:00 Disclaimer and intro 03:15 Guest bio, and one liner 05:55 Dr Arora’s Women in medicine moment of awakening 11:05 Advice to young women, “Be bold” 13:20 Picks of the week 16:45 Mistaken identity. Women not recognized as physicians due to appearance 22:05 Gender bias starts early in training and why it's important to shout-out accomplishments 31:24 Contracts, promotions and the leaky pipeline 38:32 Defining coaches, sponsors, and mentors 44:06 How to use your team and shout-out your accomplishments 52:04 How to write effective evaluations and letters that avoid gender bias 53:55 Take home points 57:00 Outro Tags: women, medicine, wim, LeanIn, leadership, mentorship, doctor, education, family, assistant, career, sponsorship, vineet, arora, care, doctor, education, family, FOAM, FOAMim, FOAMed, health, hospitalist, hospital, internal, internist, meded, medical, medicine, nurse, practitioner, professional, primary, physician, resident, student

08.06.2018

#106: Hotcakes: Cardiac risk, diabetes, pulmonary embolism, opioid use disorder, neck ties and nose picking?

Short on time but hungry for knowledge? Curbsiders’ Journal Club gives you the speedy article analysis you crave. We provide brief summaries of recent research and news items in the field of internal medicine, so you can save time and stay on top of the literature. On this episode, we were joined by Kashlak Memorial’s very own Chair of Medicine, Dr. Robert Centor AKA @medrants on Twitter or “Uncle Bob” to the Curbsider Crew. This month’s topics include: estimating atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease risk, whether CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA) effectively rules out pulmonary embolism, discharging low risk patients with pulmonary embolism from the ED, metformin and risk of acidosis in patients with CKD, treating opioid use disorder after a nonfatal overdose, Canagliflozin and renal protection in type 2 diabetes, screening for diabetes among patients below age 40, and the association between nose-picking and staphylococcus. ACP members can claim free CME-MOC at acponline.com/curbsiders (goes live 0900 EST on podcast release date). Join our mailing list to receive a PDF copy of our show notes every Monday! And hey, while you’re here, consider rating us on iTunes and leaving a review. The Curbsiders thank you! Thoughts on the Journal Club series? Article or guest nominations? Compliments or complaints? You can reach us at thecurbsiders@gmail.com. We are also on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter: @thecurbsiders.   Credits: Written by: Christopher J Chiu MD, Sarah Phoebe Roberts MPH Producers: Christopher J Chiu MD, Sarah Phoebe Roberts MPH Editor: Matthew Watto MD Hosts: Christopher J Chiu MD, Stuart Brigham MD, Paul Williams MD, and Matthew Watto MD Guest: Robert Centor MD Time stamps: 00:00 Disclaimer and Intro to Curbsiders Journal Club 04:00 Dr. Centor's Pick of the Week 06:10 Clinical Implications of the Revised Pooled Cohort Equations 12:10 Negative Predictive Value in CTPA for VTE 18:34 Can low risk patients with PE be discharged from the ED? 23:03 Is Metformin associated with Lactic Acidosis in those with low eGFR? 28:45 How do medications for opioid use disorder affect mortality after non-fatal overdose? 36:44 Canagliflozin and Renal Protection 43:00 Performance of USPSTF screening criteria for diabetes 46:08 Stuart on Nose picking 50:00 Chiu Bites: Infectious ties and physical attire 53:50 Outro Tags: atherosclerotic, cardiovascular, disease, risk, CT, pulmonary, angiography, CTPA, embolism, ED, metformin, acidosis, CKD, treatment, opioid, use, disorder, oud, mat, overdose, canagliflozin, renal, diabetes, screening, nose-picking, staphylococcus, ACP, CME, MOC, assistant, care, doctor, education, family, FOAM, FOAMim, FOAMed, health, hospitalist, hospital, internal, internist, meded, medical, medicine, nurse, practitioner, professional, primary, physician, resident, student

07.30.2018

#105: Lyme Disease and Tick-Borne Illness with ID Expert Paul Sax: Why you should never go outside or to Boston in the summer

Lyme disease and tick-borne illness deconstructed by Infectious Diseases expert, Paul E. Sax MD, of episode 78 fame. Oh, Summer Nights. The time for romance between Danny Zuko and good girl Sandy, the time to sit in the backyard around the bonfire, the time for sunset hikes in the woods and mountains…..and don’t forget, it’s also the time for those pesky woodland ticks who’ll go for a ride on you and maybe suck your blood (gross!). Dr. Sax takes us through the essentials of tick-borne illness, with a focus on Lyme Disease: diagnosing it, treating it, identifying possible co-infections, and managing Post-Lyme residual symptoms.   Our (And Dr. Sax’s) Disclaimer about this episode, and the shownotes: Tick-borne illness is a very serious problem in public health in the US, but management is quite a controversial issue. We’ve done our best with this episode to stay as evidence-based as possible. Moreover, given the limited time we have on air, we have tried to focus on what we think is most clinically relevant. Full show notes available at http://thecurbsiders.com/podcast Join our mailing list and receive a PDF copy of our show notes every Monday. Rate us on iTunes, recommend a guest or topic and give feedback at thecurbsiders@gmail.com. Credits: Written by: Shreya P. Trivedi MD, Nora Taranto AB Produced by: Shreya P. Trivedi MD, Nora Taranto AB Editor: Matthew Watto MD Images by:  Hannah R. Abrams Hosts: Shreya P. Trivedi MD, Matthew Watto MD, Paul Williams MD Guest: Paul E. Sax MD Time Stamps 00:00 Intro 02:17 Disclaimer 03:19 Guest bio 05:17 Getting to know Guest 08:33 Favorite hiking experiences 12:20 Disclaimer of Tick-borne illness 12:28 Clinical case of recent hiking in endemic area with a rash 20:59 Lyme testing limitations 27:38 Patient education to doxycycline 30:16 Case of elderly outdoorsy healthy male with flu-like symptoms in the summer 32:39 Differentiating anaplasmosis and babesiosis 33:17 Workup for patient with possible tick co-infections 39:22  Post-lyme disease residual symptoms 48:02  Case of tick attached to patient 56:19  Outro Tags: lyme, disease, anaplasmosis, babesiosis, treatment, prevention, coinfection, doxycycline, paul, sax, infectious, diseases, nejm, harvard, pcr, antibody, tick, borne, illness, chronic, post, syndrome, removal, endemic, anatomical, assistant, care, doctor, education, family, FOAM, FOAMim, FOAMed, health, hospitalist, hospital, internal, internist, meded, medical, medicine, nurse, practitioner, professional, primary, physician, resident, student

07.23.2018