On Being with Krista Tippett

By ejunto.org

SHOW DESCRIPTION

Groundbreaking Peabody Award-winning conversation about the big questions of meaning, hosted by Krista Tippett. Every Thursday a new discovery about the immensity of our lives — and frequent special features like poetry, music and Q + A with Krista.


4.6

3,668 ratings


EPISODES LIST
12.13.2018
12.13.2018
12.06.2018
12.06.2018

Living the Questions: What does civility actually mean, and is it enough?

A question from Kevin: “I have been hearing a lot of deconstruction of the word ‘civility.’ The debate around this word has become, like so many other things, binary. ‘Civility’ is either a tool of oppressors to silence those on the margins, or it is something that is necessary for every single conversation and dialogue. I’d love to hear something about this word — what it actually means, in what contexts can it be helpful, in what contexts can it be used as a tool to silence anger.” Takeaways from the podcast: — What is the inner work of civility that goes deeper than the surface of our encounters with each other? — What is the goal of civility? — “My concern for a while has been that the word is too meek; that it’s about being nice and tame and safe, and I don’t think stepping into any of the dark places and the fraught places right now can be nice or tame or safe. I always reach for other words to attach, like ‘muscular’—it has to be muscular, it has to be robust—this language we use in the Grounding Virtues, ‘adventurous civility.’ It needs to be an adventure.” — “To use civility to silence anger is using a simplistic, binary understanding of civility as a kind of passive-aggressive weapon. And that’s not what I mean when I use the word.” — “Civility is internal work that each of us needs to do.” — “A question we fail to ask, so much, in American life is not just, what do I want to happen here; what do I have to say; what do I care about; what is at stake? But, what is the most effective way that my words can be heard? What is the most emotionally intelligent way, which is also going to be a productive way, that I can embody and represent and give voice to what I care deeply about?” — “Creating spaces and experiences of robust, adventurous civility is actually very strategically effective because what you’re doing is you’re creating a space in which it is reasonable to ask people, smart people, complicated people who’ve been through complicated things, to let themselves get uncomfortable in the presence of a stranger.” — “I am passionate about what I am passionate about. I’m scared about what I’m scared about, or I’m angry about what I’m angry about. And I know there are things I don’t understand, and I don’t want to stay this way forever, and I don’t want us to stay stuck here forever. So, I want to change and grow, and I invite you to be with me in that spirit too, and let’s see what happens.” About the Living the Questions series, from Krista Tippett: "I think of a good conversation as an adventure. You create a generous and trustworthy space for it, and prepare hospitably for it, so the other person will feel so welcome and understood that they will put words around something they have never put words around quite that way before. They will give voice to something they didn’t know they knew — and you will be a witness to thinking, revelation, in real time. This is one reason that radio/podcasting is such a magical medium: Everyone who listens joins that room, becomes a witness, the moment they push ‘play.’ They are also there for the revelation. It’s a form of time travel. And if the conversation is edifying (one of my favorite, underused words), we all sync up in some mysterious way across time and space and grow a little together. In recent years, I’ve discovered that I really like being on the other side of a conversation too. Maybe because I’ve experienced that thrill of revelation so many times, I approach someone asking questions of me with great anticipation of what they will draw out of me that I can’t draw out of myself. So, last summer on social media, my colleagues and I asked for questions you’d want to throw at me. We received, and continue to receive, such a bounty." Find more at onbeing.org/collection/living-the-questions.

12.03.2018
11.29.2018
11.29.2018
11.22.2018
11.22.2018
11.15.2018
11.15.2018
11.08.2018
11.08.2018
11.01.2018
11.01.2018
10.25.2018
10.25.2018

[Unedited] Arlie Hochschild with Krista Tippett

A creator of the field of the sociology of emotion. Treating emotion seriously in our life together. “I could see what they couldn’t see but not what I couldn’t see.” Our stories as “felt” not merely factual. Caring is not the same as capitulating. One of the voices many have been turning to in recent years is Arlie Hochschild. She helped create the field of the sociology of emotion — our stories as “felt” rather than merely factual. When she published her book, "Strangers in Their Own Land: Anger and Mourning on the American Right," in the fall of 2016, it felt like she had chronicled the human dynamics that have now come to upend American culture. It was based on five years of friendship and research in Tea Party country at that movement’s height, far from her home in Berkeley, California. Her understanding of emotion in society and politics feels even more important at this juncture. So does the reflective, self-critical sensibility this experience gave Arlie Hochschild on her own liberal instincts. Caring, she says, is not the same as capitulating. Arlie Hochschild is professor emerita in the Sociology Department at the University of California, Berkeley. She is the author of nine books including "The Managed Heart," "The Second Shift," and "Strangers in Their Own Land: Anger and Mourning on the American Right," a finalist for the National Book Award. This interview is edited and produced with music and other features in the On Being episode "Arlie Hochschild — Arlie Hochschild — On the Deep Story of Our Time." Find more at onbeing.org.

10.18.2018
10.18.2018
10.15.2018
10.11.2018

Sally Kohn and Erick Erickson — Relationship Across Rupture

What happens when you call your Internet trolls. The peril of forgetting our next door neighbors. “You don’t have to love people to not hate them.” “People believe things that are mutually contradictory; I think we all do. I know I do.” — Erick Erickson Earlier this year, the University of Montana invited On Being to attempt an outside the box civil conversation between two political pundits on contrasting ends of the U.S. political spectrum. It became a sold-out, public event in the spirit of Montana’s Senator Mike Mansfield, who famously modeled integrity, courage, and humility across the partisan aisle in the tumult of 1960s and 70s. Sally Kohn and Erick Erickson are both controversial, lightning-rod figures, yet neither of them fits neatly into a partisan mold. The reaction of the youngest people in the room is what compelled us to put this on the air. They said they had not witnessed or imagined a political conversation like this possible: one marked at once by bedrock difference — and good will, humor, and a willingness to bring our questions as well as our arguments, our humanity as well as our positions, into the room, if only for an evening. Sally Kohn is a progressive columnist and political commentator for CNN. She’s also contributed to Fox News. She hosts the podcast, "State of Resistance." She’s the author of "The Opposite of Hate: A Field Guide to Repairing Our Humanity." Erick Erickson is editor of the conservative blog, "The Resurgent," host of "The Erick Erickson Show" on WSB Radio in Atlanta, and contributor to Fox News. He’s also contributed to CNN. He’s the author of "Before You Wake: Life Lessons from a Father to His Children." Find the transcript for this show at onbeing.org.

10.11.2018

Living the Questions: Can conversation make any difference at a moment like this?

“Conversation is not just about words passing between mouths and ears. It’s about shared life. Listening is about bringing our lives into conversation.” About the Living the Questions series, from Krista Tippett: "I think of a good conversation as an adventure. You create a generous and trustworthy space for it, and prepare hospitably for it, so the other person will feel so welcome and understood that they will put words around something they have never put words around quite that way before. They will give voice to something they didn’t know they knew — and you will be a witness to thinking, revelation, in real time. This is one reason that radio/podcasting is such a magical medium: Everyone who listens joins that room, becomes a witness, the moment they push “play.” They are also there for the revelation. It’s a form of time travel. And if the conversation is edifying (one of my favorite, underused words), we all sync up in some mysterious way across time and space and grow a little together. In recent years, I’ve discovered that I really like being on the other side of a conversation too. Maybe because I’ve experienced that thrill of revelation so many times, I approach someone asking questions of me with great anticipation of what they will draw out of me that I can’t draw out of myself. So, last summer on social media, my colleagues and I asked for questions you’d want to throw at me. We received, and continue to receive, such a bounty." Find more at onbeing.org/collection/living-the-questions.

10.08.2018
10.04.2018
10.04.2018
10.01.2018
09.27.2018
09.27.2018
09.24.2018
09.20.2018
09.20.2018
09.17.2018
09.13.2018
09.13.2018
09.10.2018
09.06.2018

Pádraig Ó Tuama and Marilyn Nelson — Choosing Words That Deepen the Argument of Being Alive

Two poet/contemplative/social creatives. To make sense in times of senselessness. Prayer is words and shape and art around desperation and delight and disappointment and desire. “Shame’s first language is the body.” Dignifying the desires we wish to name. “We erase our stories, we erase our existences.” Pádraig Ó Tuama and Marilyn Nelson are beloved teachers to many. To bring them together at the On Being Gathering was a delight and a balm. Marilyn is a poet and professor and contemplative, an excavator of stories that would rather stay hidden yet lead us into new life. Pádraig is a poet and theologian and social healer at Corrymeela in Northern Ireland — “a soft place for hard conversations,” of hostility met in hospitality. They venture unexpectedly into the hospitable — and intriguingly universal — form of poetry that is prayer. Pádraig Ó Tuama is the community leader of Corrymeela, Northern Ireland’s oldest peace and reconciliation organization. His books include a prayer book, "Daily Prayer with the Corrymeela Community," a book of poetry, "Sorry For Your Troubles," and a memoir, "In the Shelter: Finding a Home in the World." Marilyn Nelson is professor emerita of English at the University of Connecticut and a chancellor of the Academy of American Poets. She is the 2012 recipient of the Poetry Society of America’s Frost Medal for "distinguished lifetime achievement in poetry." Her books include "The Fields of Praise: New and Selected Poems," "Mrs. Nelson’s Class," and "The Meeting House."

09.06.2018
08.30.2018
08.30.2018
08.23.2018
08.23.2018
08.16.2018
08.16.2018
08.13.2018
08.13.2018
08.13.2018
08.13.2018
08.13.2018
08.13.2018
08.09.2018
On Being with Krista Tippett Podcast

LAST EPISODE

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