Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

By Michael Stelzner, Social Media Examiner

SHOW DESCRIPTION

Social Media Examiner's Michael Stelzner helps your business navigate the social jungle with success stories and expert interviews from leading social media marketing pros. Discover how successful businesses employ social media, learn new strategies and tactics, and gain actionable tips to improve your social media marketing. Find show notes at https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/podcast/


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EPISODES LIST

YouTube Ads: What Marketers Need to Know

Do you want to diversify your social media advertising? Wondering how to make YouTube ads work for your business? To explore how to reach more customers with YouTube ads, I interview Tom Breeze. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Tom Breeze, YouTube ads expert and founder of YouTube ad agency Viewbility. His book is titled Viewability: Harness the Power of YouTube Ads and Be There for Your Customer When It Really Counts and his course is YouTube Ads Workshop. Tom explains how user intent on Facebook and YouTube differs and why intent matters to advertisers. You'll also discover a seven-step framework to create YouTube ads that sell. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: YouTube Ads Tom's Story Tom's journey with YouTube was heavily impacted by his university studies. He graduated with a master's degree in psychology, and at around age 23, he began working with businesspeople who had anxiety about public speaking. In 2008, he started doing workshops on the subject and used Google ads to grow the business by driving traffic to his site. Then, at a 2-day presentation workshop, a few people asked for help using video to present their businesses. Oddly, Tom had just created his own video and was already seeing results; conversions on the site had increased from 7% to 22% almost instantly. As more people requested the video training rather than the public speaking training, Tom rapidly transitioned into YouTube video. He wanted to help his clients get more views, and by extension, more business. He learned how to optimize video titles, tags, and descriptions, and dove into learning more about SEO strategies. When Tom teamed up with a business partner to learn how videos could rank well in all search engines—not just YouTube—they established an entire agency around SEO. But as SEO evolved and got more complicated, Tom noticed their results started to drop. To better serve his clients, Tom decided to use his experience with Google AdWords to test ads for YouTube video. He chose a video that had been created for SEO purposes and plugged it into Google AdWords. He targeted a few simple keywords and ran the video as a YouTube ad. The results were incredible. From there, the SEO business evolved into an agency that focuses exclusively on YouTube ads. Listen to the show to learn what kind of results Tom saw from his first YouTube ad. Why YouTube Ads Matter Next, I ask Tom why marketers should consider advertising on YouTube. First, Tom says, YouTube has a lot of ad inventory available so it's easier for marketers and businesses to get placements. Second, YouTube users are highly engaged on the platform. In 2015, users in the 18-49 age range spent 4% less time watching TV than the year before, while time watching YouTube video rose by 74%. This year, YouTube reported its 1.9 million active users are collectively watching more than one billion minutes of video daily. These people are actively using YouTube as a search engine, the average viewing session is clocking in at 40 minutes, and the potential to connect with the right audience is very high. Imagine an engaged user is looking for help and finds your YouTube content. You immediately have an opportunity to create a great first brand experience. Finally, despite all these positives, only 1 in 10 brands has actually used YouTube ads.

12.14.2018

Twitter Marketing: Creative Ways to Connect With Your Audience

Wondering how Twitter engagement can help your business? Looking for tips on sharing authentic tweets and conversations with prospects? To explore creative ways to interact with your Twitter fans, I interview Dan Knowlton. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Dan Knowlton, a creative marketer, speaker, and trainer. He co-founded KPS Digital Marketing, an agency that specializes in social and video marketing. Dan explains why he stopped using Twitter automation tools and how other tools help marketers engage with fans more effectively. You'll also discover tips for starting conversations and building relationships on Twitter. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Twitter Marketing Dan's Story About 5 years ago, Dan became interested in marketing while studying business management and marketing at the University of Brighton in the UK. However, he didn't take any of the digital or social media marketing classes. His coursework and early work experience focused on traditional marketing. After graduation, Dan worked for a big company in London as part of a program for new graduates. The company trained him to run a branch as if it were his own business so he learned about sales, customer service, managing a team, team building, communication, and so on. However, the job was like running a business without the perks of running your own business, so he quit. Dan moved back in with his parents, and then traveled around Thailand and pursued his interest in online marketing. He began by learning about the topic from sources like Social Media Examiner, Content Marketing Institute, and Digital Marketer. After following a tutorial by Matthew Barby about growing a social media following, Dan was excited to see his Twitter following grow. Dan continued to get good results for himself and his dad's company, so he set up a digital marketing agency with his dad and his brother. They wanted to help bigger companies with their online marketing, too. They now work with global brands running creative campaigns with video content and social media marketing, and the agency is growing. Listen to the show to hear Dan share more about his early success growing a social media following. Advantages of Twitter Marketing To understand the benefits of Twitter marketing, marketers should think about the ways in which Twitter is the go-to platform and how their marketing can fulfill the needs of people who use it. For starters, Twitter is a place to discuss live events. With the event hashtag, you don't even need to attend the event to join the conversation. People also go to Twitter to learn about breaking news. Twitter is unique because you can follow or have conversations with high-profile people and celebrities. Compared to LinkedIn or Facebook, Twitter makes high-profile people seem accessible. People who would never answer your email might respond to you on Twitter because they're in a different mindset when they use Twitter. Marketers can use the conversational nature of Twitter for customer service and networking. To illustrate, Buffer and Mailchimp use Twitter to provide empathetic customer service and instant solutions to people's problems. Tweets can provide much better service than a voicemail menu or a website form, and simultaneously show how supportive your business is. For online networking, Twitter chats are the perfect place to meet and engag...

12.07.2018

Revenue Optimization: Maximizing ROI on Your Ads

Want your Facebook and Google ads to generate more revenue? Curious how Google Analytics data can help you find website optimizations that will help? To explore how optimizing the customer journey helps you boost sales, I interview Tanner Larsson. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Tanner Larsson, an eCommerce optimization expert who focuses on revenue and the author of Ecommerce Evolved. His consultancy is Build Grow Scale, and he hosts an event called Build Grow Scale Live. Tanner explains how marketers can analyze their whole customer-acquisition process to optimize revenue. You'll also discover how analytics data can identify four revenue leaks that are easy to fix. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Revenue Optimization Tanner's Story In 2001, Tanner owned window cleaning and Christmas light businesses that were doing well, but he was bored. So he began learning about online marketing and sales with eBay and quickly became a PowerSeller. Although he loved selling online, the technology for eBay sellers was still so basic that he spent lots of time doing things he didn't like, such as weighing packages and printing labels. Tanner then left eBay for ClickBank, an affiliate platform for informational and digital products. Inspired by people selling how-to business courses, he created one about building a window cleaning business. When he didn't get rich from this course, he realized the online space wasn't a magic place for making money. It was simply another business medium. Tanner then began learning about online marketing and sales tactics. He not only loved implementing everything he learned, but also needed a new way to make a living. After almost going blind, he had a cornea transplant, which involved a long, restrictive healing process. Because he couldn't go outside or pick up anything over five pounds, he had to sell his window cleaning business. After shifting to online sales, Tanner realized he preferred selling physical widgets, gizmos, and gadgets online. When you're selling an informational product, you have to go above and beyond to convince someone they need to buy it. Selling a physical product is easier for him because he can simply provide the supporting information. Today, as a founder of Build Grow Scale, Tanner focuses only on eCommerce. The scope of his work has included online stores, sales funnels, and hybrid solutions. Through all of his big wins and losses, he's tested everything and learned to focus on a data-driven approach to eCommerce. Some big losses with a Shopify store were especially useful in shaping Tanner's thinking about eCommerce. At first, the Shopify store took off, selling tens of thousands of products per week. But after a sudden change, he was writing $200,000 checks each month to keep the business afloat because the cash flow couldn't keep up with the growth. After Tanner figured out what wasn't working, he started looking at data in a different, deeper way. Although his principles are based on eCommerce, you can use them for selling more than physical products. They would also work for visual products, services, and so on. Listen to the show to hear more about Tanner's experience selling on eBay. 3 Mistakes Marketers Make When Acquiring Customers When marketers try to acquire customers, Tanner often finds they make three big mistakes. First, they're too focused on acquiring a customer and the first sale....

11.30.2018

LinkedIn Video: How Marketers Can Create Videos People Watch on LinkedIn

Looking to connect with an audience that has buying power? Wondering how to reach LinkedIn users with video? To explore how LinkedIn video marketing works, I interview Goldie Chan. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Goldie Chan, a LinkedIn video expert. She produces a daily video show about marketing on LinkedIn. Her courses on lynda.com include LinkedIn Video Marketing for Personal and Brand Pages. Goldie explains how LinkedIn's video audience and metrics compare to those on YouTube and Facebook. You'll also discover tips for creating and optimizing LinkedIn videos. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: LinkedIn Video Goldie's Story Goldie has been working in digital marketing for more than 10 years, focusing on social media strategy and content creation. In that time, she's worked with lots of platforms creating all kinds of content including Facebook live video, Twitch video, Instagram content, Pinterest, and now LinkedIn video. Goldie has also worked in a range of industries. She moved from a tech startup to fashion. Then she worked for Legendary Entertainment as director of social and community. The company handles blockbuster movies that tend to work well in China and in the U.S., such as the King Kong franchise and The Great Wall. Goldie worked on both paid and organic social, and on building their community. In August 2017, Goldie was taking a break in her career and got into the LinkedIn video beta. It was the perfect time to create content she enjoys, and she loves pop culture. Her first 50 videos explored branding, metrics, and historical facts about pop culture phenomena. This project evolved into her daily channel (#dailygoldie), which has subscribers from all over the world. Today, her channel continues to look at the marketing and business impact of pop culture phenomena. For example, she might explore where the majority of the marketing budget for Harry Potter went. Looking at how the books, movies, and franchise in general are marketed works with LinkedIn's business focus. And for Goldie, this approach is more interesting than expressing her fandom. Although her daily show is primarily about marketing, Goldie also talks about branding as it relates to her experiences because she frequently travels around the world. When she's speaking, she shares tips that will help her audience. As a proponent of building community, she created #LinkedInCreators, the hashtag most people who create content use on LinkedIn. Because Goldie has been posting daily videos, she can track how LinkedIn video has been developing over the past year. Whenever a bug or any issues have occurred, she witnessed it firsthand. She has found the journey to be amazing, and for the 1-year anniversary of LinkedIn video, she hosted the official LinkedIn party in New York with their video team. In addition to running Daily Goldie on LinkedIn, Goldie owns Warm Robots, a social media strategy agency. For clients like The Art Institutes, she helps figure out how to tell their stories in ways that encourage people to join and feel involved with the brand. She also helps C-level executives create their personal brands on LinkedIn and elsewhere. Listen to the show to hear Goldie share a story about helping an executive determine whether content was appropriate for Instagram. How LinkedIn Video Compares to YouTube and Facebook Video

11.23.2018

Modern Marketing: Wisdom From Seth Godin

Wondering how empathy can help your marketing stand out? Curious how trust and tension help marketers retain their customers? To explore what is and isn't working for marketers today, I interview Seth Godin. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Seth Godin, one of the great thinkers of our era. He's a prolific blogger and the author of 18 books including Tribes, Permission Marketing, and Purple Cow. His podcast is called Akimbo. His latest book is This Is Marketing: You Can't Be Seen Until You Learn to See. Seth explains why marketing messages should focus on improving people's lives. You'll also find examples of businesses that use empathy, trust, and tension to market their products. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Modern Marketing Seth's Podcast Seth's podcast Akimbo is about bending the culture, or seeing the culture and how we change it. The name Akimbo comes from the word for a bend in the river and for bending your arms to show power, the way Wonder Woman stands on a building with her hands on her hips, looking down on the bad guys. When Seth named his podcast, he also wanted his podcast to start with the letter A because many podcast apps list podcasts in alphabetical order. You're at a disadvantage if you call your podcast Zodiac Seven. Seth had an earlier podcast, Startup School, which was incredibly successful. However, he considers Akimbo to be his first real podcast because he created Startup School in 2 days as an artifact of an event he ran; he didn't create it as a podcast. Seth has been hosting the Akimbo podcast for a little over a year and has released about 35 episodes at the time of this interview. Each episode is about 20 minutes, he has no guests, and he doesn't read the ads. At the end, he answers questions that people send from all over the world. Because Seth shut down the comments on his blog, I ask how he likes interacting with his audience in the Q&A.; He says answering the questions is fun. The key difference is that the questions aren't comments and they aren't anonymous. Before he started the segment, he was worried about screening 50 good questions. However, he doesn't get many, and they're all good questions. To prepare for each episode, Seth writes the show notes first. The notes are a list of topics and often include links to relevant articles and videos. Then he riffs based on the show notes. He records the episodes by himself in the shower at his office, which is covered in foam. The shift from writing by himself to talking by himself is fascinating. Seth believes his podcast is reaching the right people in the right way: drip by drip. He doesn't spend any time or energy promoting the podcast. It's there for people who want it. Listen to the show to hear how Seth started his podcast after planning it for 10 years. What's Wrong With Marketing Today In the author's note to This Is Marketing, Seth says, "It's time to do something else with marketing to make things better." I ask what about marketing today isn't working that prompted him to write that. He responds by outlining two problems. First, some marketers are selfish, narcissistic, short-term spammers who think their behavior is fine as long as they don't break the law. They call senior citizens at home to sell them worthless collectible coins. They try to hassle people, put them in a squeeze page,

11.16.2018

How to Create Ads That Move People to Action

Want a faster, better way to optimize your ads? Did you know that focusing on customers' emotions can help? To explore how to use emotional messaging to move people to action, I interview Talia Wolf. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Talia Wolf. She's the founder of GetUplift, an agency that specializes in conversion rate optimization for websites, landing pages, and advertisements. Her course is called Emotion Sells: The Masterclass. Talia explains how to research customers' emotional connection to your product and why applying your findings improves conversions. You'll also learn how to stand out with different types of ads, color psychology, and emotional imagery. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Emotion in Advertising Talia's Story In 2007, Talia got her start in conversion optimization by mistake. At a social media agency, she worked with big local brands that focused on likes, engagement, and comments. When she asked these brands about their goals for leads and sales, they rarely knew the answer. To help increase conversions, she changed the Facebook ads and landing pages, guessing what would work. When Talia learned that an entire industry is devoted to optimizing ads, landing pages, websites, and funnels, she began finding out more about it. The more she learned, the more she loved it, which led to her starting a conversion optimization agency in 2010. For the first few years, she had to convince people to spend more money on optimizing current assets than on buying more ads and traffic. Talia's struggles to prove her value and get results inspired her to abandon her intuitive approach to conversion optimization and develop a process based on emotion and psychology. The process quickly improved her results. Within weeks, her client conversions doubled, and some even improved tenfold. She also began attracting more clients. Today, Talia runs GetUplift and helps companies optimize their websites using emotion and psychology. She also teaches her process through her masterclass. Talia teaches how to identify your customers' emotions in order to understand why people buy from you. She also explains how to apply what you learn to increase conversions from ads, landing pages, and so on. Listen to the show to hear how conversion rate optimization helped improve the sales page for Social Media Marketing World. How Emotion Helps You Optimize for Conversions Talia explains the benefits of focusing on customer emotions in order to optimize your ads and landing pages. First, you can save money and time. Because the customer-focused approach helps you find what works faster, you spend less money on testing and refining your ads. Most companies spend a lot of money driving traffic to their website or landing pages. Often, they spend money changing their ads and targeting, and still don't get the desired results, so they just continue to throw more money at different target audiences. Or they might think of conversion optimization as changing a button or headline, or adding a few more bullets. Talia says customer-centric conversion optimization is focused on understanding people on a deeper level than demographic details like gender, location, profession, income, devices they use, etc. Instead, you focus on the real challenges and pains that people coming to your website want to solve. Common marketing tactics don't help customers understan...

11.09.2018

Facebook Video: Insight From a Facebook Watch Success Story

Wondering how creators succeed with video on Facebook Watch? Curious how it compares to other social media video? To explore what marketers can learn from a successful Facebook Watch creator, I interview Rachel Farnsworth. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Rachel Farnsworth, a Facebook video expert. She's the founder of the Stay At Home Chef and author of the book, Slow Cooker Cooking. Her Facebook Watch show, Recipes, has more than 4 million subscribers. Rachel explains how her experience with Facebook Watch compares to videos on her Facebook page and YouTube channel. You'll also discover tips for measuring Facebook video performance and running ads on Facebook Watch. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Video Success With Facebook Watch Rachel's Story In 2008, when Rachel became a stay-at-home mom, she started a blog. She didn't love being a stay-at-home mom. She was bored and yearned for connection. On her blog, she shared recipes for friends and family because she loves cooking. In 2012, after she had her last child, she started trying to make money from her blog. At that point, her goal was to cover the grocery bill. Rachel's husband, who's a software engineer, suggested she make video part of her business because he believed video was the future of the internet. Although Rachel didn't watch a lot of online video at the time, she decided to try making some videos and putting them on YouTube. Rachel says her first videos were terrible. She didn't edit them, so viewers saw her turn on the camera and walk around in front of it. Everything was in real time. She quickly realized her videos weren't good, deleted those initial attempts, and began practicing offline. She experimented with new styles that showed only the food and not her face, but at that point, she still wasn't proud of her work. In 2016, BuzzFeed launched Tasty, which performed well and helped Rachel see the possibilities in what she was already doing. She started honing her craft with her own style and improved the quality of her videos. She also started a video business, making original videos for the Facebook pages of other online creators. Making videos for other Facebook pages was a tremendous learning experience. In 6 months, Rachel made about 1,000 top-down, hands-only cooking videos. After working with about 100 different pages on Facebook, she developed a keen sense for what succeeds on Facebook and what doesn't. With an understanding of how to create videos and what works on Facebook, Rachel returned to creating her own videos in October 2016. In less than 3 months, she went from 52,000 to 1 million followers. For these videos, she chose content from her blog that would translate well to video. Her first video, a 60-second homemade rolls recipe, is still among her most viewed videos. When Facebook announced Watch in June 2017, Rachel learned everything she could about it. She talked to everyone she knew who might be connected to Facebook Watch about their experiences with it. When Facebook came to Salt Lake City, where Rachel lives, they invited top YouTube creators in the area, who suggested Facebook invite Rachel, too. At that time, Rachel's YouTube channel had about 150,000 subscribers, so it was a legitimate YouTube channel but not a major component of her business. After meeting with Facebook, Rachel pursued a Watch page by sending emails and following Facebook employees ...

11.02.2018

How to Drive Organic Traffic With Bots

Want more website visitors? Wondering how Messenger bots can help? To explore how to bots can drive organic traffic to your website, I interview Natasha Takahashi. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Natasha Takahashi, a chatbot expert and founder of the School of Bots, a community for marketers seeking to master bots. She also hosts the There's a Bot For That live show, and she has a range of courses including Chatbot Agency Accelerator. Natasha explains how to integrate chatbots into your social media and email marketing. You'll also discover tips for growing your bot subscriber list and engaging with subscribers effectively. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Messenger Bots That Drive Website Traffic Natasha's Story In 2016, after working as a marketer for tech startups and with a few clients of her own, Natasha was planning to launch a social media marketing agency with her co-founder, Kyle Willis. To stay on top of everything happening in social media marketing, she watched F8 (Facebook's developer conference) remotely, where they announced Facebook Messenger bots. At the conference, Facebook showed enterprise examples, but right away, Natasha wanted to start testing whether Messenger bots would be effective for her clients, which were small- and mid-sized businesses. She thought if she could learn to market with bots really well, she might be able to make her new agency stand out. After about 4 or 5 months, Natasha's bot marketing was going well for her clients. As is common with bot marketing, her clients had high open and click rates. They also had good conversion and retention rates. Since getting started with bots 2 years ago, Natasha and her agency have built about 100 bots. Today, in addition to her chatbot agency, Natasha and Kyle run School of Bots, which launched in January 2018. They created it as a resource for chatbot marketing and strategy, with free articles, videos, and interviews with thought leaders. Their goal is to provide up-to-date content in a niche that changes quickly. At the same time, Natasha and Kyle launched the Chatbot Agency Accelerator, which teaches people how to build their chatbot agencies and add chatbots to their offerings. Although they didn't push this program, it's taken off. They've grown the community, and Natasha has been doing a lot of speaking engagements. Listen to the show to hear Natasha share what some of her hopes were as she became an entrepreneur. Why Use Messenger Bots? Natasha thinks right now is the perfect time to build a bot for your company or clients because, with all of the buzz about bots, people know about them but may not fully understand them. Although WhatsApp surpassed Messenger in terms of number of users, Natasha still recommends focusing on Messenger because its users still send more messages per month than WhatsApp users do. Also, Facebook Messenger works with chatbot platforms like ManyChat and Chatfuel, which are designed for non-coders and make it easy to create a chatbot and get results. Right now, other platforms like Slack, Skype, Telegram, and WhatsApp are still just like email in terms of how you can use them to market to users. Messenger chatbots are also a great way to drive traffic to your website now that the Facebook algorithm no longer prioritizes social posting. With a chatbot, no algorithm is controlling what people see; you can cont...

10.26.2018

Why We Abandoned Facebook Video Longer Than Two Minutes

Earlier this week, we made the decision to stop publishing three weekly shows on Facebook. I'd like to share some important marketing lessons we discovered and a resource I think you'll enjoy. Here's the video I released on Facebook, announcing the move: https://www.facebook.com/smexaminer/videos/279608756015802/ Here's why we killed two shows and moved a third one over to YouTube. All of our analysis showed that people are NOT watching video on Facebook. Especially if it's longer than about a minute or two. Why? Facebook is a highway and no one stops to watch video (at least for us.) Instead, they scroll. However, YouTube is where people prefer to watch videos that are longer than a few minutes. Here's what a typical video's retention looks like for us on Facebook: Here's the exact same video on YouTube: And we saw this pattern, over and over. The challenge for us is our YouTube audience is small—21,000 vs 533,000 on Facebook. The hardest decision was moving our 7-minute weekly docuseries (The Journey) exclusively to YouTube. It's a "behind the scenes" reality show that reveals how we do our marketing. Last week's show was about our launch strategy for our conference. Below are instructions on where to find that show. Prior to this week, our thinking was all about distributing the show as far and as wide as possible. My mindset was "go where our tribe is." So we published it natively on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Pinterest, and YouTube. At first glance it looked like we were getting 10X the views on Facebook. But the retention graphs told a different story. When I actually looked at the data, it was VERY clear that YouTube is the channel where people are actually watching our videos. Publishing Facebook content that people don't watch or engage with is bad for our page. It sends the wrong signals to the algorithm. It's not a smart strategy. So despite a small group of people on Facebook saying they absolutely loved our show, not many more were watching. Also, here is a more detailed explanation of my reasoning: https://www.facebook.com/smexaminer/videos/930051237180491/ So, that's my why. If you want to discover a lot more about how I think and how we do our marketing, this is exactly what we cover each week on The Journey. Here are some important links: How to subscribe to The Journey: There are two important steps. First click on this link and hit subscribe. The important second step is to hit the bell.  That will ensure you get notifications when we release a new episode, even if you don't hang out on YouTube a lot. Two of our recent shows worth watching: Leaning Into Launch Day: Me and my team conclude testing and begin a multi-channel product launch. Will our hard work pay off? Watch and see. Analyzing for Improved Results: Watch as we analyze what worked during launch week and begin exploring new ideas. We also prepare for a big launch of "The Journey." I want to thank you for being a loyal subscriber. It's my hope that you follow along with what we’re doing on YouTube. I'm confident you'll discover new marketing ideas and get to know us better. What do you think? Did we make the right decision? Where do you watch longer video content? Share your thoughts in the comments below.

10.24.2018

How Artificial Intelligence Is Changing Marketing

Wondering what artificial intelligence features are coming to social media and advertising platforms? Want to know how machine learning can improve your marketing? To explore how artificial intelligence will impact social media marketing, I interview Mike Rhodes. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Mike Rhodes, an expert in helping businesses with customer acquisition. He's the co-author of The Ultimate Guide to Google AdWords and CEO of WebSavvy. He offers courses on Google Display Network, AdWords, Google Data Studio, and more. Mike explains why marketers need to understand artificial intelligence and shares examples that illustrate its impact. You'll also discover how artificial intelligence can automate bidding, targeting, and messaging for your ads. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Artificial Intelligence for Marketers Mike's Story Early in his career, Mike learned that he loves helping business owners see what's around the corner. In the 1990s, Mark worked for a helicopter firm in Hawaii. In exchange for flying lessons, he helped the firm computerize. (His boss flew the helicopter in Magnum P.I.) In 2004, Mike learned how Google AdWords (now Google Ads) helped small businesses and did campaigns as favors. A few years later, Mike started his agency. His focus on future tools and techniques put him in the right place at the right time. This focus also led to Mike's interest in artificial intelligence (AI). About 3 years ago, he realized businesses will need to move from reading and listening to more sophisticated ways of interacting with customers, and learned all he could about the topic. In learning about AI, Mike wasn't focused on how to build AI-enabled technologies. He was interested in knowing how to use AI so he could figure out how it's relevant to business owners. Specifically, he spots the business problems and helps businesses identify which of those problems require AI. He also knows which off-the-shelf tools use some AI and which don't. Listen to the show to hear Mike share a story about flying a helicopter into a Kauai canyon. Why Artificial Intelligence Is Important to Marketers To explain why AI is important, Mike shares a comparison from Andrew Ng, an AI and machine learning expert. Andrew says AI is the new electricity. Just as electricity started being used to power everything 100 years ago, AI is being added to everything now. The advent of electricity changed everything, including transport, factories, and more. Similarly, AI will change the knowledge economy. For marketers, the coming changes are important because your business will benefit from being aware of AI-based tools and techniques before your competitors are. If you work on the agency side, you want to help your clients lead with AI. Although marketers don't need to understand AI in great detail, they do need to know enough about AI to spot opportunities. The Hollywood version of AI features robots with guns turning us into paperclips. The reality is more mundane and incremental. We're a long way off from AI that can run Google campaigns or send your kids to school and cook dinner. However, artificial narrow intelligence (also shortened to narrow intelligence or ANI) is likely to start replacing an increasing number of human tasks. You can think of ANI as incredibly smart software. Mark thinks, in a very optimistic version of the future,

10.19.2018

How to Cultivate Community With Facebook Groups

Want more engagement in your Facebook group? Looking for tips on shaping your group's culture? To explore how to build a loyal and engaged community inside of Facebook groups, I interview Dana Malstaff. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Dana Malstaff. She's the author of Boss Mom and host of the Boss Mom podcast. Her membership site is called Boss Mom Vault, and she's built a thriving community in a Facebook group. Dana explains how to lay the groundwork for a new group and attract members. You'll also learn how to foster group culture and engagement. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Facebook Group Engagement Dana's Story On New Year's Eve, Dana rang in 2013 celebrating her last day at her full-time job. She started the new year as an entrepreneur and an expecting first-time mom. Although she was scared and had no idea how to do either, she wanted to be amazing at both. At the time, she felt isolated, living in Columbus, Ohio, surrounded by people who had full-time jobs and no kids. After Dana's son was born, he went to daycare while she worked, and she felt a massive amount of guilt working at home and sending her baby to school, even though that's what she wanted to do. At one point, while she was working on her laptop in a café, the sight of a mom, daughter, and grandma made her cry. When Dana told her husband that she wanted to move back to San Diego, California, where her parents still live, he said, "I'll quit my job tomorrow, and we'll sell the house." Two months later, when her son was five months old, Dana was living in San Diego, surrounded by people who had kids and businesses. Being among people who were doing something similar to her was empowering. At Hal Elrod's Best Year Ever Blueprint, Dana met some people who started a mastermind group, and one of them was Azul Terronez, who helped Dana write her book, Boss Mom. The book talks about how she stopped feeling guilty about creating things while raising a child. As the book succeeded, Dana wove the Boss Mom idea into her whole brand. As part of that effort, Dana created the Boss Mom Facebook group, but Boss Mom is something much bigger than a Facebook group. Dana envisioned it as a movement with a culture. In the Facebook group, Dana guides the Boss Mom culture and creates a foundation for what people expect from it, a process similar to building culture at a company. This summer, Dana launched Boss Mom meetups, so the community has an online and offline presence. When you think about your topic as a movement with a culture, you treat it differently than many people treat their Facebook groups. With this approach, Dana's Facebook group has grown to 33,000 members, most of whom discovered the group organically through Facebook recommendations or referrals from friends. The group adds an average of 120 members weekly. Dana's group isn't only large and growing; it also has high engagement. Each month, on average, about 70% of her group members are active participants. The group has 85,000 to 89,000 interactions and about 5,000 posts each month. Listen to the show to hear Dana and me discuss possible reasons why she found more entrepreneurs in San Diego than Columbus. How to Build a Facebook Group When Dana started her Facebook group, she made a common mistake: posting in the group and telling people they should hang out with her. For a while, she was the only one posting,

10.12.2018

How to Get Customers to Evangelize Your Business

Want to increase your business's exposure in social media feeds? Curious how word of mouth can help you overcome algorithm changes? To explore how talk triggers encourage customers to evangelize your business, I interview Jay Baer. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Jay Baer. He's the author of multiple books, including Hug Your Haters, and co-author of the new book Talk Triggers. He also founded Convince & Convert. Jay explains why talk triggers help your business stand out from your competition and on social media. You'll also discover the elements of successful talk triggers and ways they can generate word of mouth. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Word-of-Mouth Marketing Why Is Word of Mouth Important? To start, Jay defines what "word of mouth" means to marketers. It's when a customer tells somebody else about a particular business. This conversation could be face to face or online via email, Skype, Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat, WeChat, or any number of other media. Also, the conversation could be one to one or via a review site like Yelp, TripAdvisor, or Angie's List. As Jay and co-author Daniel Lemin did research for the book, they found that 83% of Americans have engaged in word-of-mouth recommendations in the past 30 days. Sometimes you don't notice you're giving a recommendation. At a recent party, Jay listened to the conversations for 3-4 minutes and heard at least 8 recommendations for movies, books, software, and conference speakers. Most research Jay and other engagement labs have done focuses on online word of mouth, which is anonymous or semi-anonymous. A Yelp reviewer doesn't know who'll see their review. When you tweet, you know only that you're speaking to your followers in the aggregate. However, the newest research finds that online word of mouth accounts for only half of all recommendations. The other half of all recommendations are offline and happen in face-to-face conversations or over the phone, so these recommendations are just as important as online ones. Also, in business, neither type of word of mouth is studied as much as it should be. Depending on your business and product, word-of-mouth recommendations influenced 20%-90% of every dollar that you have. After outlining how important word-of-mouth recommendations are to every business, Jay notes that businesses typically don't have a word-of-mouth strategy. Whereas businesses have an overall digital strategy and strategies for social media, public relations, and content, they approach word of mouth by assuming their customers will talk about them. But maybe customers won't. Jay draws a distinction between a word-of-mouth strategy and a viral post. Businesses welcome virality because it provides disproportionate reach, and they'll try to produce posts they hope will go viral with a surprise-and-delight tactic. That is, the business treats a particular customer in a remarkable way, hoping the customer shares their experience on social and it goes viral. Aiming for a viral post isn't a strategy; it's a stunt. It's like buying a lottery ticket. Although delighting a customer in this way isn't a bad idea, this approach isn't a strategy because it's not repeatable. Even if you're fortunate enough to have a viral post, you can't grow your business with viral social media posts over and over. To grow your business with an approach that's scalable,

10.05.2018

How to Sell With Facebook Lead Ads

Want your Facebook funnel to be more profitable? Wondering how Facebook lead ads can help? To explore how to sell with Facebook lead ads in an unconventional way, I interview Oli Billson. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Oli Billson. He's a business growth expert who specializes in direct response and marketing automation. He's co-host of Path to Purchase Podcast, and his course is called Next Level Growth. Oli explains why a mobile-only funnel that collects phone numbers helps you have conversations that improve sales. You'll also discover tips for setting up Facebook lead ads, qualifying leads, and texting with prospects. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Facebook Funnel with Lead Ads Oli's Story Oli grew up in the UK, and at a young age, he became a high-performance tennis player who played all over the world. After he fell out of love with tennis, he needed another way to channel his energy. He'd always looked up to his father, who was in business, so when Oli was 15 years old, he started his first business building custom computers. The business grew quickly, and soon he was exporting computers to Asia. Oli went on to build several businesses fairly organically and through mainstream media advertising. Then in 2003, he started advertising with Google AdWords. At the time, pay per click was new, and the ads had amazing results with cheap leads and quality customers. Because Oli believes no one should rely on a single traffic source, he was quick to start running ads when Facebook introduced its advertising platform. Google AdWords was intent-based, whereas Facebook ads worked more like display advertising. Oli viewed Facebook ads as a huge opportunity to dial into all of the demographic and psychographic details for audience targeting. Today, Oli spends most of his time running Next Level Business, an eLearning platform that helps entrepreneurs and business owners grow their businesses beyond seven figures. He also runs an agency called Oliver Billson that does marketing and consulting for thought leaders. Listen to the show to hear more about Oli's experience with Google AdWords. Common Facebook Funnel Mistakes When your sales process relies on someone having a conversation with a prospect to make the sale, the funnel needs to collect information that helps you have that conversation. Often, funnels that don't work aren't designed with this end conversation in mind. Instead, these funnels focus on activity at the top of the funnel. For instance, a funnel might generate leads, but those leads don't convert into prospects with whom you can have a quality conversation and make a sale. Traditionally, marketers generate brand awareness through advertising on various broadcasting media or online, and then the sales team actually talks to people. Now that almost everything is sold online, the sales process has lost a little bit of the human touch. There are still plenty of products, though, that require the seller to talk through the sale with potential customers. Oli has found that even when an automated, end-to-end marketing sales funnel with Facebook Ads is working, it's not as profitable as it could be. So retooling your funnel to focus on conversations has a lot of side benefits over an automated sales process. Listen to the show to hear Oli share more about who can use marketing and sales tactics focused on conversations.

09.28.2018

How to Get More Engagement With Facebook Live

Want more people to watch, share, and comment on your live videos? Looking for tips on improving the quality of viewer engagement? To explore how to get more engagement with Facebook Live video, I interview Stephanie Liu. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Stephanie Liu, a live video expert and social media consultant. She hosts a Facebook Live show called Lights, Camera, Live, which is focused on helping businesses succeed with live video. Stephanie explains how to promote your Facebook Live video with events and crossposting. You'll also discover how questions, requests to share, and bots can improve Facebook Live video engagement. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Engagement With Facebook Live Stephanie's Story Stephanie is an ad agency veteran. After working in the ad agency world for about 15 years, she decided to start her own business focused on a social media strategy. In a crowded field, Stephanie decided the best way to stand out was to do live video. She wanted to be an early adopter to separate herself from the pack. About 2 years ago, when Periscope was a big deal and Facebook Live was just rolling out for the masses, Stephanie started going live with OBS Studio, and Facebook Live provided the most client referrals. In a collaboration with Chef Claudia Sandoval, the winner of MasterChef Season 6, Stephanie had one of her early successes with live video marketing. Claudia was working with T-Mobile and MasterChef on a Facebook Live promotion for the new T-Mobile Tuesdays app. Claudia noticed Stephanie's efforts to break into live video and asked for Stephanie's help figuring out how to do it. Stephanie planned a low-tech live video with Claudia using a regular iPhone 6 and one ring light. They created plans to generate buzz before the live event, keep people engaged during the broadcast, and keep the app top of mind and tip of tongue after the live broadcast. During the live stream, Claudia made her famous Tres Leches Cake recipe. The broadcast lasted about an hour and a half. The whole time, someone held the iPhone by hand. They didn't have a tripod because Claudia was moving around the kitchen, and this was before anyone was using a live gimbal. The results of the promotion were amazing. As soon as Claudia went live, the video had 843 peak live viewers. Right after the broadcast, 1.5 million people opened the T-Mobile Tuesdays app, and Claudia's cookbook had 178,000 downloads. Since then, Stephanie has continued to help clients build their brands and bottom lines with live video. Whether a client is launching their own Facebook Live show or incorporating live video into their events, Stephanie helps make their live video marketing a success. Listen to the show to hear Stephanie talk about her friendship with Claudia. Why Focus on Facebook Live? Stephanie thinks marketers who want to hit the ground running with Facebook should focus on Facebook Live because it has 10 times more reach than all other types of Facebook content. Since Facebook changed its algorithm in January 2018, organic reach has been dwindling to nothing. Facebook Live video also has six times more interactions than recorded video. These interactions keep your brand top of mind and tip of tongue, and are a way to attract the meaningful engagement that Facebook wants.

09.21.2018

Pinterest Strategy: How to Get More Traffic From Pinterest

Want more visitors to your website? Wondering how Pinterest can help? To explore how to drive more traffic to your website with Pinterest, I interview Jennifer Priest. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Jennifer Priest, a Pinterest expert and social media strategist. Her courses are Smart Pin Pro and Hashtag Pro. She also blogs at SmartFunDIY.com. Jennifer explains how to improve the visibility of your pins with hashtags. You'll also discover how fresh images and multiple boards help you boost website traffic. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Pinterest Strategy Jennifer's Story Jennifer started using Pinterest in its early days when you needed an invitation from a current user to join. For several years, she was a Pinterest user for personal, not professional, reasons. In 2014, she started monetizing her blog, which she used to promote her crafting classes and supplies. However, her sponsored content, ads, and affiliate links didn't bring in much money. Her blog wasn't getting enough traffic. Although she was pinning her content and thought she was doing all of the right things, she wasn't seeing the amazing results from Pinterest that she heard people raving about. In 2015, to improve her Pinterest strategy and increase traffic to her blog, she began researching and testing Pinterest strategies on her blog and with her clients' Pinterest accounts. Seeing how the math worked helped her zero in on a strategy that increased traffic. Today, Jennifer still has her blog and runs an agency, Smart Creative Social, where she manages Pinterest accounts for clients whose products are sold in big stores like Walmart and Target. Since she started researching Pinterest marketing strategy, the tactics she uses have evolved as the platform has announced many changes and new features. Because Jennifer and many of her clients are solopreneurs or very small businesses, she continues to emphasize automating Pinterest marketing as much as possible. The strategies have to be something they can actually do in the course of their day. They can't use strategies that require hours of their time. Listen to the show to hear about the time-consuming tactics Jennifer avoids. Why Use Pinterest? Pinterest is growing quickly. It has about 250 million monthly users, and the male demographic is growing. From a traffic perspective, Pinterest has become a resource similar to Google in that Pinterest helps people find content and new ideas. For instance, people use Pinterest to find recipes or ideas for planning their lives. Pinterest is also about sharing. Even if you don't pin your content on Pinterest, other people can. However, you have more control over how your content appears there if you understand how the platform works and actively pin your content yourself. I add that for Social Media Examiner, Pinterest drives organic traffic in a way that Twitter and Facebook don't anymore. Listen to the show for more of my thoughts on organic traffic from different social media platforms. How Pinterest Hashtags Drive Search Traffic Jennifer has a sophisticated strategy for increasing traffic with Pinterest that includes adding hashtags, refreshing pins, and maintaining multiple boards. With this strategy, she blogs less frequently than she used to and focuses on driving traffic to her conten...

09.14.2018

Instagram Live: How to Create and Repurpose Live Content

Want to grow your audience with Instagram Live? Looking for tips on creating Instagram Live videos? To explore how to create and repurpose Instagram Live videos, I interview Todd Bergin. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Todd Bergin, also known as Todd.LIVE. He's a live video and Instagram video expert. His course is called Instagram Live Podcaster. He's also the host of the 'Grammer School podcast and the Entrepreneur Live podcast. Todd shares tips for improving your content, video, audio, and lighting. You'll also discover tactics for building your audience and repurposing Instagram Live videos. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Instagram Live Todd's Story Todd started his first business and developed a taste for entrepreneurship when he was 13 years old. Someone stole his bike, and his parents couldn't afford to replace it. To make money, he started knocking on doors and making deals to mow lawns, rake leaves, and other lawn care jobs. After college, Todd tried a few different careers and businesses. In South Carolina, he owned a fresh market with 14 employees, but quickly realized that type of business wasn't his calling. While he was in law school around 1998, he started selling items on eBay and Amazon, and followed the news cycle to determine what would sell well. By 2009, Todd had been practicing law for several years and started his first Internet-based business outside of eBay or Amazon. After he became interested in firearms, he needed aftermarket parts for a gun that didn't work very well and found someone to make parts for him and his friends. That effort turned into a business that he still runs himself, sending things out about 2 days per week. Because that business has done well, Todd was able to quit practicing law and try other things. His wife was able to quit her six-figure job, too. Todd started other online businesses that didn't work out but were good learning experiences. In fact, around 2015, one of those businesses, a business coaching company, naturally led him to live video and teaching people how to do it. In the live videos Todd made to market his business coaching skills, he found himself talking more about how to do live video than how to become a full-time entrepreneur. He also realized teaching people how to set up a studio is easier. You can build a studio in a weekend, but a successful business can take years. A few live video pioneers further inspired Todd to pivot to live video coaching. When Todd was sick in bed with the flu, he watched Gary Vaynerchuk do a Super 8 (going live on eight platforms at once) for 8 hours to promote his book, Ask Gary V. Todd watched the whole thing and was inspired by how Gary reached people all over the place, had a lot of fun, and changed lives quickly. Vincenzo Landino was another source of inspiration. Early on, his live videos displayed lower thirds (text in the lower third of the screen). He also used a split screen to bring people on his show. Todd taught himself how to set up a studio that allowed him to go live on multiple platforms and use multiple computers using Wirecast and Switchboard Live. He also took a class to begin building his audio production skills. By the time Instagram Live showed up, Todd found it refreshing because Instagram makes it so easy to go live as a broadcaster and for viewers to find you.

09.07.2018

How to Build Better Stories With Collaboration and Improv

Want fresh ideas for your marketing content? Curious how improv techniques can help? To explore how collaborative storytelling can help you create engaging or interactive content, I interview Kathy Klotz-Guest. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Kathy Klotz-Guest. She's a storytelling expert and the author of Stop Boring Me. She also hosts a Facebook Live show called Yes, And Brand Show. Kathy explains why collaborative storytelling encourages your audience to engage with and share your content. You'll also discover how to turn ideas from a collaborative story session into awesome social media posts and videos. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Collaborative Storytelling Kathy's Story Kathy became a storytelling expert after working in technology and communications for 15 years. Although she worked in the tech and marketing world during the day, she was also telling stories on stand-up and improv comedy stages 5 or 6 nights per week. When she left her day job, her goal was to share how concepts from improv can help businesses. Improv is short for improvisational, and improv comedy is all about a team getting suggestions from the audience and building a scene based on those suggestions in real time without a script. It's collaborative, and Kathy thinks business storytelling can work this way, too. Specifically, because improv encourages the audience to participate and collaborate in the experience, the audience is incredibly engaged. As the improv team tells stories, people are at the edge of their seats. Also, with the audience's input, the stories go in amazing directions. The improv model is a huge contrast to the boring old models of storytelling in business. These models aren't collaborative. They're focused on the business instead of the audience. By bringing to companies the improv concepts of creating together and collaborating with audiences, Kathy thought businesses could create stories with their customers and partners, and have more fun. At first, Kathy tried these tactics in her day job running marketing and communications for a technology company. Then the birth of her son was a catalyst to move forward with her idea. That was 8 years ago. Today, she works with companies on their storytelling and communications. Specifically, Kathy helps companies identify where their communications aren't effective or collaborative. Many companies can improve communications among both internal teams and with their audience. To do that, she helps them rethink the entire storytelling experience so they listen to and include their audience. She calls this mix of improv-meets-narrative strategy collaborative storytelling. Listen to the show to hear Kathy discuss how the show Whose Line Is It Anyway? is a good example of improv. The Benefits of Collaborative Storytelling When you create stories with your customers and have more interactive experiences, you have higher engagement, better ideas, and a better sense of what your customers like and don't like. This collaborative effort begins internally. Teams often have untapped capital. However, because the team isn't communicating or maybe just doing the same things over and over, the team isn't developing fresh ideas. Another part of this collaborative style is reaching out to customers by asking them to finish a story, share what they like about it,

08.31.2018

Messenger Bot Funnels: How to Nurture Prospects Toward a Sale

Thinking about getting into Messenger bots? Wondering how to use bots to get people into marketing funnels? To explore what you need to know about setting up a successful funnel using Messenger bots, I interview Mary Kathryn Johnson More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Mary Kathryn Johnson, a Messenger bot expert who advises and helps businesses build bots. Find out more about her at MessengerFunnels.com. She also hosts the Parent Entrepreneur Power podcast. Mary explains why Messenger bot funnels complement and improve upon email marketing. You'll also discover how meaningful audience interactions and lead magnets can move people into an automated Messenger funnel. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Facebook Messenger Bot Funnels Mary's Story Mary has worked in online business since 2003. Right before she began working with bots, she was hosting the Parent Entrepreneur Power podcast, which she began in 2014, and consulting with businesses on digital marketing. Most of Mary's consulting clients were in the beauty industry: estheticians, spas, hair salons, and so on. As their businesses grew, they didn't have time to do their own digital marketing and began asking Mary to do it for them. To fill this need, Mary created an agency called Beauty Tech Tools in 2016. For about a year, she did all of their digital marketing. Mary made significant changes to her business after she discovered bots in January 2017. She signed up for a webinar hosted by Andrew Warner, who was highlighting the benefits of bots, such as 80% open rates and 60% click-through rates. Although Mary typically prefers webinar replays to actually attending, she happened to have the time to attend this one. During the webinar, Andrew built a bot live with Chatfuel. Based on what she learned, as well as all of her knowledge and experience in marketing, Mary began changing everything she was doing for her clients. She switched all of her beauty industry clients over to bots and began phasing out her other marketing services to focus exclusively on bots. Mary thinks bots make sense with the whole marketing journey. Marketers keep fighting for higher numbers and for people to move into their funnels, and see content and offers. To accomplish the shift to bots, Mary began with a few trial projects that helped her prove to herself that her plan would work. First, she pre-sold two bot-based funnels for $1,000 each. Mary usually doesn't say she builds bots because that's like saying you build emails. Instead, she focuses on the funnel aspect, which is why she named her new company Messenger Funnels. After Mary had this initial success with bots, she took Andrew's course and began building bot funnels for more clients. Bot funnels are similar to email funnels, but in Messenger. Also, after continuing her work with bots, Mary has discovered how bots are useful beyond just automated sequences. Today, she's helped more than 50 clients. To serve her clients, Mary doesn't just build a bot. She also makes sure it fits a client's current marketing and sales strategy, and the client's future vision for their marketing. Listen to the show to hear my thoughts about Mary's success in podcasting. Why Messenger Bots Are Important Right now, Facebook Messenger is the communication channel where almost all of your prospects are.

08.24.2018

The Facebook Ad Algorithm: What Marketers Need to Know

Want to lower your Facebook ad costs? Looking for tips to optimize your Facebook ad campaigns? To explore the Facebook ads algorithm, I interview Ralph Burns. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Ralph Burns, a Facebook ads expert. He runs Tier 11, an ad agency focused on serving eCommerce businesses. He's also a co-host of the Perpetual Traffic podcast. Ralph explains how your bidding and campaign objective settings can help or hurt your ads budget. You'll also learn how the Facebook ads algorithm determines whether your ads provide a good user experience. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Facebook Ad Algorithm Ralph's Story Around 2007 or 2008, Ralph began running online ads on his sales and management blog. With AdWords, the blog had good pay-per-click traffic. In 2009, Ralph's blog led to his being fired from his corporate job in sales and management. To make more money, he became an affiliate, selling other people's stuff with pay-per-click ads via networks such as Yahoo! and MSN. When Facebook started placing ads in the right column, Ralph began running affiliate ads on Facebook, too. Back then, the targeting wasn't nearly as good as it is today. The only targeting options were gender, age, where someone lived, whether someone was interested in men or women, and relationship status (single, married, or it's complicated). With the targeting options available, Ralph thought he could be successful running a dating offer and became a super affiliate for the dating service Christian Mingle. Through this experience, Ralph learned that Facebook was a tremendous platform with an amazing amount of traffic. When Facebook started running ads in the news feed, Ralph became one of the early adopters of direct response advertising and he's been doing it ever since. Along the way, Ralph started his agency, Tier 11. In the beginning, the agency worked primarily with information-based products such as coaching services. Today, Tier 11 focuses primarily on eCommerce clients but still works with some information-based products. To sell physical products, Tier 11 uses a strategy called the eCommerce amplifier, which converts cold audiences into purchasers or even long-term customers. The agency has a large team, is rigorous about choosing clients, and has a close relationship with Facebook. Listen to the show to hear Ralph and me discuss the pros of being fired. Why Does Facebook Have an Ad Algorithm? The Facebook ad algorithm works with the auction and is a big black box few people understand. Facebook uses the ads algorithm to determine the best ads to show the best audience while also creating a good user experience. In January 2018, Mark Zuckerberg said Facebook will prioritize meaningful interactions. This priority shift has changed how the algorithm and auction work. The Facebook ad algorithm doesn't give highest priority to the highest bid because Facebook wants to create a good user experience. If advertisers monopolize the news feed, Instagram, the right-hand column, or wherever you're advertising on Facebook, people won't return to Facebook. As a public company, Facebook needs more advertisers to generate the earnings that interest Wall Street. But it also has to keep its users happy. The auction manages these competing factors by way of the Facebook advertising algorithm.

08.17.2018

How to Grow: Wisdom From 6 Years of Podcasting

In this special edition of the Social Media Marketing podcast, I reveal four lessons I have picked up from 6 years of podcasting (and growing Social Media Examiner). The topics I'll cover include how to grow anything, how to succeed via omission, how to achieve thought leadership, and my view on competition. I'll also share the original story of this podcast and much more. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I share stories from the podcast that illustrate how to grow your business. I explain how finding help and understanding your audience can help your business succeed. You'll also find tips for becoming a good thought leader and collaborating with others in your industry. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: How to Grow How The Social Media Marketing Podcast Started In the summer of 2012, I knew we were launching Social Media Marketing World in 2013. While many people knew about Social Media Examiner, they didn't necessarily know who I was. I was looking for a creative way to get in front of my audience. At the same time, I noticed that many of my peers were moving toward podcasting. I reached out to Cliff Ravenscraft and hired him to teach me everything I needed to know about podcasting. A couple of months later, on August 10, 2012 I went live with our first episode. In those early days, I used to the show to introduce people to myself and the guests who would speak at Social Media Marketing World. The existing Social Media Examiner audience contributed to the initial success of the show, and that year 1100 people attended the conference. And I had discovered a true passion. In 6 years, we have broadcast 314 weekly episodes. The show has just shy of 15 million downloads and continues to be ranked in the top 100 podcasts in Apple's Business category. While the show has, for the most part, remained unchanged, we did update a few things in 2018. We have a new voice and new music for the intro and outro, and we updated the cover art Listen to the show to hear Mike reminisce about some of his early show topics. How to Grow by Getting Help I'm good at what I do because I've perfected it over the years. However, my perfectionism is also perhaps my biggest weakness. The process for producing this podcast is a great example of how my perfectionism can get in my way. When I started this podcast, I did everything. I recruited and scheduled each guest, and recorded and edited the podcast audio. Then my team turned it into a blog post and scheduled it. With this process, I spent 3 to 4 hours working on each episode. However, as Social Media Examiner continued to grow, I started to feel the squeeze of my other responsibilities and wondered if I could hand off parts of the podcast process. Today, my assistant completes a detailed analysis of all of the people that I'm considering for the show. Her analysis includes examples of their speaking and audio, thought leadership, and focus. She also gives me her gut reaction. If her gut reaction says a prospective guest isn't a good fit, I don't even read the rest of the email. I say that I agree and we move along. In 2018, I finally gave up editing the podcast. Although I enjoy editing in Adobe Audition, I found someone better than me, and the cost is worth it. Now, I spend 90 minutes producing the podcast. First, I do a 30-minute pre-call where I get to know the guest so we sound as if we've bee...

08.10.2018

Facebook Analytics: What Marketers Need to Know

Wondering how Facebook Analytics differs from other analytics tools? Want tips for improving the performance of your funnels and ads? To explore how Facebook Analytics can help marketers, I interview Andrew Foxwell. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Andrew Foxwell. He's a Facebook ads expert who runs Foxwell Digital, an agency for direct-response eCommerce brands. He's built and run numerous trainings for Jon Loomer and co-hosts the eCommerce Influence podcast. Andrew explains how Facebook Analytics compares to Facebook Insights and Google Analytics. You’ll also learn how Facebook Analytics helps you analyze funnels and the lifetime value of a customer. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Facebook Analytics Andrew's Story After college, Andrew worked as a Windows server engineer but realized that type of work wasn't for him. In 2008, he volunteered for a congressional campaign, where he worked on the candidate's website, among other things. After the candidate won the election, Andrew went to Washington, D.C., where he worked on the congressperson's press, Facebook page, and Twitter. As part of Andrew's work in D.C., he also worked on new rules for members of Congress so they could use their official funds to advertise on social media. Before that, members could only send glossy mail pieces. After the rules changed, candidates could run ads that said, "Like my page to learn more about my economic policy," and things like that. After continuing to work with members of Congress through another company, around 2013, Andrew became director of social at 3Q Digital in San Francisco. There, he worked with brands like GoPro, Fitbit, Eventbrite, and Square. Soon after he started that job, Facebook announced the ability to run ads in the Facebook news feed; whereas before, ads appeared only on the right. Seeing the full arc of Facebook advertising and its development has been an interesting experience. Andrew believes it's become much more effective for advertisers. Now we're in an age of transparency with Facebook advertising, which is fantastic. Today, Andrew runs Foxwell Digital, where he and his wife help people understand how to build a social direct-response program and make sure it's lucrative. He also stays on top of new social advertising features and capabilities, which is how he found Facebook Analytics. In fall 2017, after playing around with Facebook Analytics for a month, Andrew called John Loomer and said they should create a program about it right away. Their program began running in December 2017. Andrew is interested in Facebook Analytics because it begins connecting a lot of dots for people. Listen to the show to hear Andrew discuss his work with the internal Facebook Analytics team. What Is Facebook Analytics? To introduce Facebook Analytics, I ask Andrew to explain what it is and how it's different from Facebook Insights and Google Analytics. Andrew says Facebook Analytics, at its core, allows you to see how your Facebook properties connect. For instance, you can see how audiences for your Facebook page and Facebook pixel connect or overlap. You also see how people interact with your website. Because Facebook pixel is a core component of Facebook Analytics, you can see how people travel through your site and interact with different parts of Facebook events. As an example,

08.03.2018

How to Create a Live Show on YouTube

Wondering what you need to stream a live video show? Looking for tips on working with the hardware and software? To explore what you need to create a live show on YouTube, I interview Dusty Porter. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Dusty Porter, a video and tech expert. He hosts the YouTube Creators Hub podcast. He's active on YouTube and a TubeBuddy ambassador. Dusty explains how to use OBS live-streaming software to produce quality audio and video. You'll also discover tips for appearing on-camera and creating a structure for your show. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: YouTube Live Video Shows Dusty's Story Dusty got his start in video with a screencast he created to help a freelance partner learn how to do something in Adobe InDesign. That was the first screencast and the first YouTube video he ever made. After he uploaded the video to YouTube, he forgot all about it. A year later, in 2007, Google emailed Dusty to say the video was doing well and ask if he'd be interested in making money with its partner program. He was interested, and when he logged into his YouTube account, he saw the video had 208,310 views. He remembers this number precisely because he was so surprised by all of the interest, especially given the poor quality of the video. At that point, Dusty realized the potential of making YouTube videos. That same day, he put together his gear and a studio, and began the journey to creating his current business, Porter Media. To hone his skills, Dusty took classes at his local technical college, focusing on videography and audio production. He believes his story shows that you simply need to be willing to learn to get started. In 2011, when YouTube live video was released, Dusty was quick to begin using it. However, the software and systems were limited. You could click a button to go live, but you couldn't set up events or plan your live stream. Justin TV, which is now Twitch, was first to the live-streaming market, and Dusty also tried Google Hangouts. Although Dusty's early work in live video was mostly dabbling, in late 2013 and 2014, he began to see live streaming as important to the future of video. YouTube significantly improved its live streaming so it's now actually in the live-streaming game. Since starting his business, Dusty has created 700 YouTube videos and more than 100 streams on YouTube, Twitch, Facebook, and other platforms. Listen to the show to hear why the original name of Dusty's YouTube channel didn't work. Tips for Starting a Live Show on YouTube When you want to start a live show, you can use the same tools to live-stream on any platform, whether that's Facebook, YouTube, Periscope, or elsewhere. Most people live-stream via their mobile devices. They simply tap the Live button on whatever platform they're using. Few people use tools like OBS Studio. (OBS stands for Open Broadcaster Software, and we discuss it in more detail later.) To do a live show on YouTube, your very first step is to create a channel. Make sure your channel name and imagery fits your branding. If you search YouTube for help starting a live show, you'll likely see some of Dusty's videos in your search results because he tries to simplify the process. Even with a more sophisticated setup that includes OBS, you can complete the setup in 30 minutes to an hour.

07.27.2018

Instagram Stories Strategy: How to Make Stories That Benefit Your Business

Want to attract more leads with Instagram? Curious how a story arc on Instagram Stories can help? To explore how to use Instagram Stories for business, I interview Tyler J. McCall. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Tyler J. McCall. He's an Instagram marketing expert who's focused on Instagram strategy. His membership community is the Follower to Fan Society. He also co-hosts The Recurrent Revenue podcast. Tyler shares timesaving tips for repurposing content for Instagram Stories. You'll also learn how to boost follower engagement by creating Instagram stories with a beginning, middle, and end. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Instagram Stories Strategy Tyler's Story Tyler's love of Instagram began when he started a side business selling a room-and-linen spray called Mr. McCall's Fine Fragrances. Tyler made this spray on his kitchen table with essential oils and printed the labels on the copy machine at his full-time workplace. He turned to Instagram as a way to market the spray. Tyler's marketing background was grounded in the non-profit world. For about 8 years he worked full time doing non-profit marketing management, such as volunteer recruitment, fundraising, sales, and so on. However, in 2014 and 2015, when he began marketing the spray, the influencer age of Instagram was also just beginning. On Instagram, Tyler was following a ton of different people whose content he loved. Those people tended to be home, lifestyle, and travel bloggers. He communicated with people, built relationships, and commented on others' content. When Tyler launched his product, he sent direct messages to the people he followed (who had tens or hundreds of thousands of followers) asking if he could send them the spray so they could let him know what they thought. They all said yes. Soon, Tyler was receiving product reviews, and they posted about the spray on their Instagram accounts. (This was before influencers charged for posts.) For a year, Tyler built the business via online and in-person sales. Toward the end of 2015, he left his full-time job and started doing social media management with a focus on Instagram for other people. Through these initial jobs, he discovered he enjoyed the work and started a small agency with a close friend. They helped local businesses create Instagram content and manage accounts. After Tyler and his agency partner went their separate ways, he focused on building an Instagram presence for himself, as well as local and national clients. He now teaches his clients how to use Instagram in an intentional way. When you grow the right kind of community, you can grow your business and sell more online. When Instagram Stories came out in August 2016, Tyler had just gone on Snapchat, which was really hot. The Snap Spectacles came out, and WOW airlines did a cool Snapchat marketing campaign for the whole summer. The airline let five or six influencers take over their Snapchat account and flew them around the world for the whole summer. Inspired by the WOW campaign, Tyler focused on Snapchat but soon began posting regularly to Instagram Stories. He quickly realized the connections he made and relationships he developed helped his business. Instagram Stories helped him make sales. People joined his mailing list, Facebook group, and programs.

07.20.2018

Facebook Ads for Webinar Funnels: How to Maximize Your Results

Want a scalable way to share your webinar? Looking for tips on building trust with a cold audience? To explore how to build a Facebook ads funnel for an evergreen webinar, I interview Andrew Hubbard. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Andrew Hubbard. He's a Facebook ads expert who specializes in helping people sell digital products and services to fill their evergreen webinars. His course is called Amplified Ads. Andrew explains how to develop an evergreen webinar and automate your funnel. You'll also discover tips for creating Facebook retargeting ads that build warm audiences, boost webinar attendance, and improve conversions. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Evergreen Webinar Funnels Andrew's Story Like many people, Andrew started working with Facebook ads in a roundabout way. Around 2012, he ran his first ad for a side project. After his initial ads had good results, he ran Facebook ads to sell mobile app installations, and those ads were successful too. His Facebook ad cost was $1 per user, and each user spent $2 in the app. That's when he realized the real potential of Facebook ads. In late 2014, Andrew left his full-time job as a business analyst for Australian Public Service and started his own business. At first, his consulting work focused on his skills as a business analyst because that role was comfortable and familiar. However, after a client learned about his experience setting up Facebook ads, they asked for his help, and those ads had good results, too. After that early success with Facebook ads, Andrew started thinking about switching his focus to helping people with ads. To test his idea, he looked for an ad-management client. He chose a target market, found an influencer in that target market, and offered to help that person for free in exchange for a case study. For the influencer, Andrew got a $6 return on each $1 spent. Andrew deliberately chose an influencer because he believed the case study would help prove that his services were valuable. Influencers and businesses making more than $1 million per year won't hire an unknown person to manage their ads. The case study helped him build his reputation and gain people's trust. After Andrew did the case study, his business grew quickly. At first, he had clients for all sorts of things, including eCommerce, different types of social media advertising, and so on. However, he enjoyed working with webinars the most, and that's where he had the best results. Because webinars worked best for him, they became the focus of his business. Listen to the show to hear Andrew talk about his first webinar clients. What's an Evergreen Webinar Funnel? To create an evergreen webinar funnel, you first need to create a webinar that works as a video recording, which you offer on an ongoing basis. In the webinar, you present some content and pitch a product or service at the end. Your webinar can be a recording of a live webinar or a recording created without an audience. Andrew prefers a recording of a live webinar because sharing it live helps you know whether the webinar works. To find the right content for an evergreen webinar, Andrew suggests doing a series of live webinars and choosing the one that converts the best. With a recorded evergreen webinar, you can present your offer to large numbers of...

07.13.2018

Messenger Bot Strategy: How Businesses Can Use Bots

Want to boost conversions while lowering marketing costs? Wondering how Facebook Messenger bots can help? To explore how to improve your marketing and sales with Messenger bots, I interview Molly Pittman. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Molly Pittman. She's a Facebook Messenger bot expert. She also co-hosts the Perpetual Traffic podcast. Her business is Digital Strategy Book Camps, and she's an ambassador for ManyChat. Molly explains why Messenger bots have high open rates and convert customers without being pushy. You'll also discover how you can easily improve marketing campaigns with Messenger bots and ManyChat Growth Tools. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Facebook Messenger Bots Molly's Start With Messenger Bots When Facebook released a Messenger ad placement in November 2016, Molly was actively running Facebook ads and covering Facebook ads for Digital Marketer. She immediately realized bots would become more important because Messenger ads would require marketers to automate different responses. So along with Messenger ads, Molly became interested in bots and ManyChat. Molly focused on ManyChat because so many people mentioned it to her. Ezra Firestone told her the tool could build a Messenger subscriber list. When 10 other people told her the same thing, she knew ManyChat was something she needed to check out. To see how it worked, she installed it on the Digital Marketer and Ryan Deiss pages. Soon, Molly was on this podcast talking about her early experiments with ManyChat because it was a marketer-centric platform. At Social Media Marketing World 2018, Molly also moderated a keynote with Chatfuel and ManyChat, which are two major contenders in the marketing world. Now she's doing some work for ManyChat. Listen to the show to hear my thoughts about Social Media Examiner's chatbot strategy. The Present and Future of Messenger Bots To begin our conversation, I note that the 2018 Social Media Marketing Industry Report revealed that only 15% of marketers are using Messenger bots, but 51% plan on using Messenger bots in the next year. So these bots have come a long way but are still a growing, early-stage technology. Molly says marketing on Messenger and communicating with bots present a huge opportunity for marketers because you can communicate with people in a place where they want to have the conversation. Any communication channel where people exchange short, simple messages, whether that's Messenger or WhatsApp, is hot right now. Specifically, Facebook Messenger has more than 2 billion active monthly users, which is more people than those who use the Facebook app with the news feed. So Messenger is important because it's where people are having conversations with their family and friends. Also, the consumption and adoption rates for Messenger are incredibly high. For example, Molly has a client with a campaign audience of more than 10,000 people and a 96% open rate on Day 6 of a follow-up sequence. Open rates are so high because people tend to open messages in Messenger. It's less crowded and more personal than email. Also, many people receive message notifications. When you look at using bots to help you have those conversations on Messenger, the present state of bots is different from the future-focused examples you see a...

07.06.2018

Twitch: What Marketers Need to Know

Want to know how Twitch is growing live video audiences? Wondering how Twitch supports loyal, engaged communities? To explore what marketers need to know about Twitch, I interview Luria Petrucci. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Luria Petrucci. She's the cofounder of Live Streaming Pros, a website that offers incredible content and services for live streaming and helps you master live video. She's also helping the next generation of young entrepreneurs build their business skills. Luria explains how the Twitch ecosystem supports creators and influencers focused on a range of topics. You'll also discover tools and tips for building a loyal community via live video. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Twitch What Is Twitch? Before Twitch was Twitch, it was called Justin TV, which was one of the earliest live-video platforms along with Ustream. Today, Twitch is a live-streaming platform owned by Amazon. Each month, Twitch has more than 100 million unique users and 2.2 million broadcasters. It also has about 15 million active daily users, which means they're either watching or broadcasting content. Nearly half of the users watch more than 20 hours of content each week. Currently, about 81.5% of users are male and 55% of them are 18-34 years old. For about the last 5 years, Twitch has been known as a gaming platform where you watch people play games. However, for the past year, Twitch has been actively expanding its content base, which will make it relevant to more businesses. After posting some videos back in 2007, Luria recently returned to Twitch and goes live 5 days a week for her Geeks Life channel, which covers geeky topics. Luria has a lot of fun with this channel. It has a weekly show as well as content about gaming, behind-the-scenes details about producing video on demand (VOD), and a live vlog. However, Twitch's popular communities go beyond geeky topics like programming, video editing, and comics. It also has communities for music, art, and DIY. Music broadcasters play guitar or piano or sing, sharing covers or original compositions. Visual artists share painting, drawing, and sculpture. DIY enthusiasts focus on a range of topics such as sewing, cooking, and LEGO. On Twitch, community is the number-one priority for the platform and the people who use it. For example, Twitch has big yoga and LGBT communities. Although the yoga community will learn by doing yoga, the live-streaming content is focused more on hanging out than being educational. You can watch and interact through your computer, a mobile device, or TV box. Listen to the show to hear Luria share more about the different types of content on Twitch. How Twitch Differs From YouTube YouTube is primarily recorded video, whereas Twitch focuses on live video. You can upload videos and watch them even if you missed the live broadcast. However, Twitch users don't watch as much on-demand content. Luria says that user behavior might change as the platform changes, but Twitch is only beginning to evolve. Like YouTube, Twitch has a search feature that works really well. However, Luria finds that the results deliver live content first and then VOD. Also, Twitch has a Browse tab where you can discover popular communities such as gaming, music, and art. Unlike YouTube,

06.29.2018

Curiosity Marketing: A Better Way to Win Loyal Customers

Want your audience to ask about your products? Wondering how to spark people's interest? To explore how to use curiosity in your marketing, I interview Chalene Johnson. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Chalene Johnson. She's a marketer, speaker, and teacher. She's also the author of the book Push and founder of 131 Method, a site that helps people get healthy and lose weight in non-traditional ways. Chalene explains how authentic connections and a little bit of mystery keep your audience interested in your content. You'll also discover tips for creating cliffhanger content and answering people's questions. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Curiosity Marketing Chalene's Story Most people know Chalene from her work in health and fitness. She's appeared in many infomercials and exercise DVDs. However, she's been successful in fitness because she loves business and helping people solve problems. In fact, Chalene has spent a large part of her professional life teaching people about marketing, building an online business, and developing passive income. Chalene finds that marketers often copy other people who are successful (or assumed to be successful). But when you do that, you lose authenticity and fail to listen to yourself. You do things that don't come naturally to you and don't tune into what you like, what would grab your attention, and how you would like to be talked to. When Chalene finds herself thinking she should do what her competitors are doing, she reminds herself of her passion for her own message and desire to serve others. Also, you don't know the ins and outs of someone else's method. For instance, you don't know how big their team is, how much experience they have, how much traffic they receive, or what they want their lifestyle to look like. Listen to the show to hear my thoughts on the problems with following someone else's playbook. Why Is Curiosity a Powerful Concept? People want to connect the dots, and when they can't, their curiosity is powerful and motivating. For example, when a child can't see what's under the bed, they imagine something's under there. In business, your goal is to get people's attention, maintain it, and engage with them. Curiosity can help you accomplish those goals. Nowhere is keeping people's attention more challenging than on TV, where you see shows like Storage Wars pique viewers' curiosity before cutting to a commercial. Storage Wars is a cable TV show where abandoned storage units are auctioned off. Sometimes they're filled with nothing; sometimes they're filled with amazing treasures. To keep you engaged, just before the show cuts to commercial, the door on the storage unit slides up so you can glimpse inside. Then you're left wondering, "Was the unit a bust or was there something valuable in it?" Chalene thinks it's important to translate this tactic to marketing to keep people's attention. The longer you have someone's attention, the more likely you are to build trust. Listen to the show to hear my thoughts on cliffhangers. Chalene's Strategy Chalene's strategy for curiosity marketing is built on authenticity, growing your community, and asking questions. To make these concepts easy to remember, she has a phrase for each part of her strategy.

06.22.2018

How to Use Facebook Ads to Improve Your Video Views

Want longer video views on Facebook? Wondering how the Facebook suggested video feed can help? To explore a creative way Facebook ads can improve your video views, I interview Paul Ramondo. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Paul Ramondo. Paul is a Facebook ads expert who vlogs about digital marketing. His agency, RamondoMedia, helps people generate leads and sales using Facebook ads. His course is called Funnels 101. Paul shares how Facebook's suggested video feed increased watch time of his vlogs to 100%. You'll also discover Paul's step-by-step process for setting up Facebook ads to maximize video views. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Facebook Watch Time Paul's Story In 2008, Paul loved going to local music shows. He wasn't a musician but wanted to be involved in any way he could. So he started running shows for a local event-management company. At the time, print media was important but also quite expensive. Although Facebook wasn't widely used in Australia, MySpace was huge, especially in the music scene. So Paul got his start in social media marketing running promotions for local shows through MySpace. The platform was free, whereas a traditional print magazine ad cost $300. This work sparked Paul's love for marketing. In fact, at around the same time, he chose to study marketing when he went to university. After Paul finished his degree, he started working at a social media startup agency in Perth. In that role, he created organic content mostly for Facebook but also for other social platforms. He also started playing around with Facebook ads. Back then, Facebook ads were basic sidebar ads with limited targeting options. At first, Paul didn't really know what he was doing, but after he began to understand how ads worked, he was absolutely hooked. He became even more excited about his work after the Facebook pixel became available and he could track what people did on websites. Paul was especially interested in tracking ads' impact on eCommerce. As an example, the ability to accurately track the revenue your ad spend generated as well as other metrics was exciting. From that point forward, Facebook ads became his primary focus. Before Paul started his company, he worked at different agencies and on the client side. For one client, Paul built a funnel that used Facebook to reach a qualified audience. The funnel took the audience through awareness, generating traffic to blog articles, a lead magnet, and then conversion. By spending about $6,000, the funnel generated $164,000 worth of sales in a 34-day period. That experience also helped Paul realize he wanted to focus on Facebook ads. Listen to the show to hear more about Paul's successful Facebook funnel. Paul's Experience Increasing Facebook Video Watch Time About a year ago, Paul started vlogging on YouTube, mostly as a creative outlet. He was spending a lot of time creating content and at first pushed it out only to his YouTube channel. People were engaging with the content, but the reach was incredibly small. Paul was spending so much time creating his vlogs, he wanted more viewers and started repurposing his vlogs on his Facebook page. His YouTube channel had about 100 subscribers, whereas his Facebook page had about 4,000 followers.

06.15.2018

Fun: How to Love the Work You Do

Are you struggling to balance your work and personal life? Wondering if the hustle and grind are worth the toll they take on you? To explore how to bring fun back into your work, I interview Joel Comm. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Joel Comm. Joel co-hosts The Bad Crypto Podcast and is the author of 15 books. His latest book is The Fun Formula: How Curiosity, Risk-Taking, and Serendipity Can Revolutionize How You Work. Joel shares how he learned the importance of living life on his terms. You'll discover how the Fun Formula can improve your life. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Fun at Work Why Joel Wrote The Fun Formula On social media, businesspeople are bombarded with the message that they need to hustle and grind to succeed. If you want to get to the top, if you want to beat your competition, you need to hustle and grind every day. Get up and into the office before your competition, and work while your friends barbecue on the weekends. Joel thinks this philosophy is incredibly damaging and counterproductive to a successful business and a fulfilling life. For Joel, hustling or grinding caused him to spin his wheels more than anything else. It hurt him and his relationships. That's why Joel sees this mindset as potentially dangerous. During his 23 years of doing business online, Joel has succeeded not because he worked incredibly long hours, but because he was curious, explored something he was passionate about, took a risk and was willing to fail, and allowed things to unfold in a natural manner. Essentially, he succeeded when he was having the most fun. Joel thinks the hustle and grind mentality goes back to his parents' generation. They believed hard work is a virtue, and so does Joel. At times, you do need to buckle down and do the work. But the hustle and grind mentality is unsustainable as a lifestyle. Just because working hard sometimes is a good thing doesn't mean working hard all the time is even better. Listen to the show to hear my thoughts on balancing work and fun. Authenticity on Social Media Social media encourages people to share only the positive things in their lives, not the real difficulties or struggles that they're having. People want to seem popular with lots of friends and also highly successful. Some people focus on promoting themselves and sharing only what's good. Others lie about who they really are and what they're going through. Another issue is relying on social feedback (such as likes, comments, shares, follows, and retweets) for one's self-esteem or sense of self-worth. This social feedback pumps people up. However, social media wasn't intended to be a place where people's lives seem perfect or are validated with likes, comments, and shares. Joel thinks these issues put the focus in the wrong place. Rather, Joel has the most respect for people who are authentic on social media by sharing the good, the bad, and the ugly. They're the people he's most likely to trust and buy from. In addition to authenticity, I mention the fear of missing out. Because I've been working hard on some projects, I'm not active on Instagram or doing anything with stories on Facebook, Instagram, or Snapchat. Although I enjoy watching my colleagues share stories about their lives, I also wonder if I'm doing something wrong because I'm not sharing...

06.08.2018

Personal Brand Pivot: How to Become The Next You

Wondering how you can become known for something new? Looking for tips to help you focus your brand on a different area? To explore how to pivot your personal brand, I interview Amy Landino. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Amy Landino (formerly Schmittauer), the host of AmyTV. She's a video blogger, speaker, and coach. She's also the author of Vlog Like a Boss. Amy explains how she researched and tested new content before rebranding her YouTube channel. You'll also find tips to help you determine whether pivoting your brand is right for you. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Pivoting Your Personal Brand Amy's Pivot From Video Marketing to Empowerment Amy is known for her work as a video marketing consultant, which she did for about 10 years. In 2011, after she left her 9-to-5 job, she branded herself to convey that she was someone you could trust because even then, she had to contend with oversaturation in the social media consulting space. With all the incredible thought leaders, Amy wanted to stand out. In the marketing business, people didn't frequently talk about how to make a good video, and Amy had that skill. She started using YouTube in 2007 and became an active user in 2008. With her first public YouTube channel, Schmittastic, Amy learned how to make video and market content to get viewers. Although she didn't think of it as marketing, it led to her love for the industry. In 2011, when Amy started her business channel, Savvy Sexy Social, she wanted viewers to know, like, and trust her for social media and video content marketing. On this channel, Amy consistently produced three episodes per week, and her YouTube presence was helpful as she started and grew her business. She needed clients, and the videos were the best way for Amy to market herself. At first, Savvy Sexy Social offered social media advice that would help organizations be more social. Video became a big part of the conversation because video was her medium. In other words, because Amy used video to teach what people wanted to know, she began teaching people how to use video to teach what they know. In 2017, Amy's book about video blogging came out. She also married and changed her name. And her channel content was evolving. Savvy Sexy Social was no longer the right name, so she knew the name had to go. Ultimately, Amy built up to a big change and decided to make 2018 her time to pivot. In January, she released a video under her new name and welcomed people to AmyTV. httpv://youtu.be/6aQwsOIteoo Amy pivoted and rebranded her channel for several reasons. First, she had more to share than tips and tricks about video. Most of all, her audience wanted more. Plenty of people tuned into her channel with zero intention of "vlogging like a boss." They simply admired her motivational content, which Amy discovered by reading comments on her videos. Whenever Amy shared a video, she tried to understand what was going on in viewers' minds after they watched it. She wanted to know their first barrier to entry. As she investigated those comments and dug into the issues of her audience, she discovered they wanted her to talk about productivity, time optimization, and how to go after success even if you don't feel destined for it. Amy knew this change was coming for a couple of years.

06.01.2018

Alexa Flash Briefings: What Marketers Need to Know

Want to reach people regularly via their smart speakers? Wondering how Alexa flash briefings work? To explore how marketers can benefit from Alexa flash briefings, I interview Chris Brogan. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Chris Brogan, a digital marketing advisor for large businesses. He specializes in customer experience marketing with a focus on emerging technology. He's also host of the new podcast, Making the Brand. Chris explains why now is the time to tap into the Alexa platform. You'll also discover how to save time developing flash briefing content and managing your audio. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Alexa Flash Briefings Chris's Start With Smart Speakers Chris says he's never on the bleeding edge of anything. The first time he encountered a smart speaker, he wasn't impressed. You could ask it to play a song, but he doesn't play music nonstop in his house and has nicer speakers than that device. However, when Chris learned about Alexa flash briefings and similar technologies on other platforms, he saw a business application for a conversational interface. For example, when Chris bought a Windows laptop to play a game with his son, he set up the laptop through Cortana, the Windows conversational interface. In retail shopping, to compete with Amazon, Google Home partnered with Walmart and eBay. Apple has Siri. Marc Benioff, CEO of Salesforce, just announced he's trying to make a conversational interface for doctors so they can do prescriptions and patient care through an audio device as well. As the major technology companies come out with their own conversational interfaces, the increasing competition suggests these companies know something about this technology that regular folks don't. As the technology continues to emerge, Chris thinks the current opportunities mean that now is the right time for marketers and companies to start thinking about how to use it. Listen to the show to hear Chris discuss how conversational interfaces are like Jarvis from the movie, Iron Man. The Potential for Alexa Flash Briefings As artificial intelligence and voice recognition technologies continue to improve, natural language processing allows people to interact with a device without using perfect syntax. The software doesn't have to hear all of the words perfectly. It can guess the meaning from context. For instance, any of these devices can respond to a user who says, "Blank product, tell me about the weather," or "Blank product, is Ed Asner still alive?", or "Blank product, when is the next time Avengers: Infinity War is playing in my neighborhood?" In all sorts of cases, you can use this technology instead of looking at your screen. Chris believes voice technology is in the same place as mobile several years ago, when people were saying, "Mobile's coming. Mobile's coming." After mobile truly arrived, websites that didn't prioritize mobile stopped appearing in Google search results. Similarly, because voice technology can now understand what we say regardless of inflection, accent, and so on, magical things are happening. Industry leaders are talking about the increased adoption of smart speakers. A very recent article from PSFK said 65% of people age 25 to 49 interact with an AI assistant (which is another term for a smart speaker) at least once a d...

05.25.2018

Crisis Planning: How to Publicly Respond to Business Problems

Want to be prepared for problems in your business? Wondering how to plan a public response to any issue? To explore when and how businesses should respond publicly to a crisis, I interview Gini Dietrich. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Gini Dietrich, a crisis management professional. She's the founder and CEO of Spin Sucks, a site that helps businesses thrive with their public online communications. She also hosts the brand-new Spin Sucks podcast. Gini explains how to handle a range of problems from online trolls to crises that threaten your reputation or revenue. You'll also find tips for preparing company leaders to speak transparently to the public and handling a crisis quickly and effectively. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Crisis Planning What Is a Crisis? In the past, PR agencies focused on crisis communications, and they were able to specialize in it because the crises were so few and far between. Today, somebody can be upset with a flight, a hotel stay, or a Crock-Pot killing a fictional TV character and take to Twitter, Facebook, or any social network where the issue can become blown out of proportion. Today, everybody has a megaphone because of social media. Before, if you were upset with somebody or something, you told your neighbor, your friends, and your family, but your message was contained to about 30 people. Today, you can be upset about something and share it with thousands of people. In this environment, it's important to identify an issue versus a crisis. You have an issue when somebody is antagonizing you or pushing your buttons, but their comments aren't going to go anywhere. On social media, issues are common and might be painful for a day or two or maybe even a week. But as long as the comments don't cause reputation or money loss, it's an issue, not a crisis. A crisis has the potential to cause a stock price decline or a loss of customers, revenue, or reputation. Issues and crises exist on a spectrum, where a troll creating an issue might be a level 1, and the money or reputation loss is a level 10. You need to think about how you respond to each level in between. I ask whether the Cambridge Analytica story would be a level 10 crisis for Facebook. Gini says she would categorize that crisis as an 8 or 9 because the whole world is talking about that story, so Facebook has taken a reputational hit. However, after Mark Zuckerberg testified before Congress, stock prices went up. Because Facebook isn't losing money, the crisis isn't a 10. Listen to the show to hear Gini and me discuss how well Facebook handled the Cambridge Analytica crisis. How to Handle Issues Gini was recently in a Facebook group conversation with Jay Baer and Mitch Joel about whether to respond to trolls who leave negative, one-star book reviews on Amazon. Mitch Joel suggests not responding because his book won't be for everybody. However, Jay Baer thinks you should respond to them in order to hug your haters and make them feel warm and fuzzy. From a crisis perspective, Gini leans more toward Jay Baer's perspective. Although you're not necessarily going to change the mind of a troll, a negative reviewer, or the person who's upset with you, your response can incentivize other people who see your response.

05.18.2018

How to Generate Leads and Sell With Live Video

Want to increase leads and sales? Wondering how live video can help? To explore how to sell and generate leads with live video, I interview Nicole Walters. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Nicole Walters. She's an income strategist and hosts a live show on Facebook called The Monetized Life. Her course is called $1K in 1 Day Academy. Nicole and I will explore how you can use live video to build a following and generate leads. Nicole has figured it out, and we're going to talk a little bit about her story, how she's doing it, and bring you lots of tips today. Nicole shares her formula for hosting a live video that provides valuable content. You'll also learn how a live product launch can boost sales. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Leads and Sales With Live Video Nicole's Story Nicole's journey toward entrepreneurship started with a blog she created in 2011. At first, her blog documented her process of cutting off all her hair and growing it back without chemicals. From there, she continued blogging every day about hair and beauty. When Nicole started her blog, it was a side project. She was an executive working a 9-to-5 corporate job. She loved showing up in the office every day, working with people, and doing work that she loved. As Nicole applied what she'd learned in corporate America to her blog, her blog business began to thrive, and she built a decent following. However, Nicole began to realize that although blogs were popular, she did really well on video. The problem was that she lacked the video editing skills to compete on YouTube. Nicole says her YouTube videos were disasters because they went nonstop for 15 minutes without any editing. However, her competitors, who were also in the blogging space, had the editing expertise to produce Steven Spielberg–like flicks. Their videos were so good, she wouldn't have been surprised to see pyrotechnics. When Nicole decided to leave her corporate job and pursue blogging full-time, live video was really starting to pick up. Her first platform was Periscope, and during her live videos, she documented her preparations to quit her job and transition to full-time blogging, and her plan to consult with businesses on the side. When the day finally came for Nicole to quit, she went live to say, "Guys, today is the day. I'm going to quit. I'll be back." But when people asked her to keep them on the line, she did. She quit her job live, online, in front of 10,000 people. That choice was scary because she didn't know what her boss would say or how the process would go. Because she had such a large live audience, she was receiving messages like rapid fire. Over the course of that entire day, more than 150,000 people watched the video. But in the moment, Nicole forgot all about her phone. Her mind was racing from the knowledge she was quitting her job. Fortunately, the whole thing went well. Later, people told Nicole the video was inspiring or they were scared for her. People also told her she was making a bad decision and burning a bridge. But Nicole had no plans to return to her full-time job. She was going headfirst into entrepreneurship. As she shared how scary her transition to full-time blogging was, live streaming became her thing. On Periscope, people call her ScOprah because she spends all her time the...

05.11.2018

Marketer to Instagram Influencer: The Josh Horton Story

Want to become an Instagram influencer? Wondering how to maximize the exposure of your Instagram posts? To explore how to become a full-time Instagram influencer, I interview Josh Horton. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Josh Horton, known online as Jugglin' Josh. He's a marketer turned influencer with more than a million followers across all of the social channels. He also holds 12 Guinness World Records, and he's been on The Ellen Show. Josh explains how he uses various Instagram features to share content and grow his following. You'll also learn how producing content for YouTube differs from Instagram. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Becoming an Instagram Influencer Josh's Story In 2011, Josh graduated from college and planned to be a professional juggler. After performing for several months, Josh joined a social media agency started by a friend of a family friend. Josh was the eighth hire, and he started out part-time, deleting spam and cusswords from Facebook pages. When the company (McBeard Media, which later became part of Fullscreen Media) began to grow, they offered Josh a full-time job. Because he worked remotely, he could work full-time and continue performing on the side, juggling and traveling for shows. After a couple of years, Josh was managing a team of coordinators, graphic designers, and video editors. He helped run day-to-day operations of multiple brand pages, including Sony Pictures. Every movie from Sony Pictures had its own Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, and sometimes Snapchat account. He also helped create graphics and videos posted to other brand pages every day. However, the deeper Josh fell into this job, the less he focused on juggling. In 2015, when Josh turned 25 years old, he realized he had no juggling gigs booked. Although juggling was a side hustle, it was also his passion. So within a month of his birthday, he quit his job. Originally, he planned to focus on performing on stage at halftime shows and corporate and community events. But because he knew all this stuff about social media, he decided to also try growing an Instagram following. Josh focused on Instagram because he enjoyed that platform the most and figured it was the easiest place to grow a following. Today, although Josh is still performing, his social media following has grown to a point where it makes him more money than his performances do. Listen to the show to learn more about Josh's work at the social media agency. How to Grow a Following on Instagram When Josh quit his job, he had around 8,000 Instagram followers. Now, he has about 260,000. Josh began trying to grow his following soon after Instagram launched its video feature. From his agency work, Josh knew he needed to make something that was so good people would want to like, comment on, or share it. Compelling Videos: To encourage engagement, Josh edited his juggling videos into polished content with music and transitions. With those videos, he gained followers organically. Then he found viral video accounts on Instagram, which have millions of followers and post other people's content. He gained a lot of followers when those accounts reposted videos of his trick shots. Some of those accounts reposted his videos with permission, and others didn't get permission.

05.04.2018

Facebook Groups: How to Develop Engaging Communities

Want to create an engaged Facebook group? Are you looking for creative ways to develop a loyal community inside a Facebook group? To explore how to develop an engaged and responsive community with Facebook groups, I interview Caitlin Bacher. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Caitlin Bacher, a Facebook Groups expert who has helped many people start and grow successful Facebook groups. She hosts the Social Boss Facebook group, and her course is called The Fab Facebook Group System. Caitlin explains how to choose a niche for your Facebook group that complements your business goals. You'll also discover tips for promoting engagement and moving group members into your marketing funnel. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Facebook Groups Caitlin's Story Shortly after her daughter was born, Caitlin was looking to earn extra income for her family. She started freelancing as a social media manager because she loved social media and always had an affinity for building communities, whether they were on- or offline. By 2014, she had attracted a few steady clients and joined a couple of Facebook groups for social media managers. These groups were a godsend to Caitlin, not only because they offered valuable information, but more importantly, they allowed her to connect with other social media managers in a meaningful way. By the end of 2014, Caitlin had decided to switch to social media coaching and knew starting her own Facebook group would be an important component of this business. Caitlin started without an email list, social media following, or team. But she did have a really clear vision for the community that she wanted to create and a 100% commitment to making it happen. Caitlin typically chooses the content she teaches based on her experience and uses the lessons she learned to make things easier for others. When she started coaching, she focused on Instagram so she had a big Facebook group geared toward talking about Instagram. However, as her group evolved, Caitlin saw her Facebook group had more traction than her Instagram, where she sold her Instagram coaching and courses. People were obviously in the Facebook group to learn from Caitlin, but they were also there to connect and support each other. Caitlin sensed a difference between her group and other groups. In groups that focused on facts or tips and tricks, people came in and out for content or help troubleshooting something specific. However, people visited Caitlin's group to see what Caitlin and their friends were doing while having their morning coffee or after they dropped off the kids at school. It was an amazing shared experience. Since then, Caitlin started coaching people on running Facebook groups. Three years later, Caitlin's attention and focus on her vision have paid off. She's running a million-dollar business that fully supports her family and helps thousands of others grow communities to support their businesses. Listen to the show to learn how Caitlin used Periscope in her group before Facebook Live existed. How to Start a Facebook Group When Facebook announced changes on January 11, 2018, Mark Zuckerberg himself said the news feed will prioritize posts from friends, families, and groups over pages. For those of us who value community,

04.27.2018

How to Use Facebook Lookalike Audiences With Custom Audiences

Want to expand your ad reach on Facebook? Looking for new ways to target potential customers? To explore creative ways to combine Facebook lookalike audiences with custom ad audiences, I interview Rick Mulready. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Rick Mulready. Rick is a Facebook ads expert and host of the podcast, The Art of Paid Traffic. He's also a regular speaker at Social Media Marketing World. His new membership site, The ROI Club, is focused on Facebook ads. Rick explains custom and lookalike audience options that help you make the most of your customer list. You'll also discover how to use website visitor data, engagements, and lead ads to find new potential customers. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Facebook Lookalike Audiences What Is a Facebook Lookalike Audience? A lookalike audience is a targeting audience based on a custom audience. Examples of custom audiences include people on your email list, website visitors, and Facebook users who engage with your video or Facebook page. When you create a lookalike audience of a custom audience, Facebook finds users who have similar attributes to the people who are in that base custom audience. For example, say you have an email list custom audience. To create that audience, you uploaded a list of 10,000 people and Facebook has matched those emails to 6,000 Facebook users. For a lookalike audience based on this custom audience, Facebook will look for Facebook users with similar attributes to those people on your email list. Facebook knows a lot about its users. Although the data is anonymized, Facebook makes that data available to advertisers to help them reach their ideal target audience. Listen to the show to hear Rick's and my thoughts about all of the things Facebook and Google know about users. Why Use a Lookalike Audience? Lookalike audiences give you a way to reach a cold audience beyond interest or behavior targeting. For example, say you're showing targeted ads to warm traffic, such as people on your email list, website visitors, or Facebook fans. Lookalike audiences give you a way to reach cold audiences that are like those warm audiences but much bigger. Depending on how closely you want to match your base audience, you can set up a lookalike audience size that's anywhere from 1% to 10%, where the 1% includes only those people who most closely match your base audience. In the U.S., that 1% audience is about 2 million people. As you move toward 10%, the audience size increases but the matching becomes more generic. You can control the size with a slider that appears when you create the audience. In Facebook Ads Manager, open the Audiences tool and click the Create Audience button. Select the option to create a lookalike audience, and then a box pops up where you select a source, a location, and then the audience size. The source is the custom audience on which you want to base the lookalike audience. The location is the country or regions on which you want to base the lookalike audience. The audience size has the slider that lets you choose 1%, 2%, 3%, and so on. You also see an advanced option to create multiple versions of that lookalike audience size. Although a lookalike audience is a cold audience, it's not super-cold (compared to interest or behavior targeting) because Facebook is u...

04.20.2018

Predictive Analytics: How Marketers Can Improve Future Activities

Want your marketing to be more efficient? Wondering how predicting your marketing cycles can help? To explore how marketers can get started with predictive analytics, I interview Chris Penn. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Chris Penn, the co-founder and chief innovator at Brain+Trust Insights. He's also the co-host of the Marketing Over Coffee podcast and the lead analytics expert for Social Media Marketing World. Chris explains how to ensure the quality of underlying data used in predictive analytics. You'll also discover data sources and tools used to make predictions. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Predictive Analytics Chris's Story Chris got started in analytics through his background in IT. In 2003, he started working as IT director of a student loan startup, where his role expanded beyond traditional IT responsibilities. In addition to running the web and email servers, he also updated the websites and sent the weekly email. Chris was doing this work before Google Analytics existed, so when the CEO of his company asked how the websites and emails were performing, Chris didn't have an answer. To figure it out, Chris and his team started developing their own tools to understand the basics, like how many people visited the website each day. Over time, the analytics practice became a core focus for Chris. He was not only trying to learn what happened, but why it happened and how the business could respond. Listen to the show to hear Chris discuss his educational background. What Are Predictive Analytics? Predictive analytics use statistics and machine learning to analyze data and make predictions. Humans are very predictable. We all follow routines, such as brushing our teeth and then taking a shower, or putting on each piece of clothing in a certain order each morning. Because humans are predictable on both a micro and a macro scale, marketers can mostly predict what will happen. For instance, in North America, if you're a B2C marketer, you pretty much know that you're going to be busy from November 1 to December 26 because that's a peak time for product sales. Similarly, if you're a B2B marketer, your busy time is January 1 to about the end of May. Then business picks up right after Labor Day in the United States and Canada and continues through U.S. Thanksgiving. Outside of those times, it's a lot harder to be a marketer, whether you focus on digital, social, or paid. Listen to the show to hear more examples of predictable human behavior. What Can Predictive Analytics Do? Because we know these things generally, machines can help us make these predictions more specific. The value of predictive analytics is their specificity. If you know which week you should do more Facebook Live or spend less on ads, you can be more efficient and effective in your marketing. If you know how to predict, you can make money, save money, save time, and not get fired. Predictive analytics specifically focus on trying to find out what happens next. For the average marketer, time series predictions (or when something is going to happen) are the most conventional and useful application. To illustrate, if you're a social media marketer, you want to know when to staff up your customer service team to answer customer inquiries.

04.13.2018

How to Combine Facebook Ads and Content for Better Results

Want to optimize the content in your Facebook ads? Wondering how to build connections that improve conversions? To explore strategic ways to combine content and Facebook ads, I interview Keith Krance. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Keith Krance, a Facebook ads expert. He's host of the Perpetual Traffic podcast, founder of Dominate Web Media, and coauthor of The Ultimate Guide to Facebook Advertising. Keith explains how to create content and calibrate your budget for each phase of the customer journey. You’ll also learn how to apply Keith’s Facebook ads formula to lower your ad spend. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Facebook Ad Content Keith's Story Keith became a Facebook ads consultant in a roundabout way. He grew up in a small town thinking you had to be a doctor or lawyer to be successful. However, he didn't want to go to school for the years it took to enter those professions. Instead, he went to the University of North Dakota to become an airline pilot and, four years later, was flying for a regional airline. However, as a young pilot, Keith realized he didn't have the seniority to be home for Christmas or Thanksgiving. After a friend gave him the book, Rich Dad, Poor Dad, Keith started his entrepreneurial journey, which he feels is a true reflection of his personality. In 2003, while he was still flying, he started investing in real estate. After doing well with real estate, he began investing in local franchise businesses. By 2005, he was out of the real estate game and became a franchisee of two different businesses. He had a couple of different partners and five different locations. Over the next five years, Keith focused on his franchise businesses and became interested in Facebook ads around 2010. He was already learning about the digital marketing world when his girlfriend told him about Facebook. He was amazed by what he could do with Facebook ads compared to billboards, for which he paid $10,000 per month to advertise in a mediocre location. From that point, Keith went all-in on Facebook and quickly learned how to run successful ads. Due to changes in the franchise business, Keith eventually transitioned completely out of that industry and decided to focus entirely on helping other people learn how to advertise on Facebook. Keith began building his consultancy by networking and getting results for local clients. At a consulting event for Perry Marshall, Keith connected with a client who hired him because he had self-published a book. About 5 months later, word had spread that Keith had cut a client's lead cost by 68%, and Perry Marshall's team reached out to Keith about working together. After Keith had worked with Perry for a while, Perry asked him to coauthor The Ultimate Guide to Facebook Advertising, which is now in its third edition. Keith also started the Perpetual Traffic podcast with Digital Marketer and was working on growing his agency. Since then, Keith found a partner to run the agency so he could focus on the education and consulting certification side of the business. Listen to the show to hear more details about Keith's transition from piloting airplanes to running an agency. The Big Mistake in Facebook Advertising In Facebook advertising, the big mistake people often make is focusing on the wrong stuf...

04.06.2018

LinkedIn Prospecting: How to Find and Connect With Future Customers

Do you want more clients? Wondering if LinkedIn can help you acquire more business? To explore how to use LinkedIn to find leads and turn them into customers, I interview John Nemo. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview LinkedIn marketing expert John Nemo. Author of LinkedIn Riches: How to Use LinkedIn for Business, Sales and Marketing, John is also host of Nemo Radio podcast, which is focused on online marketing and lead generation. He has worked to rewrite LinkedIn profiles for well-known individuals such as John Lee Dumas, Ray Edwards, and Chris Brogan. John shares which LinkedIn and third-party tools he uses to identify and manage his prospects. You'll discover how John develops LinkedIn connections into pre-qualified leads and clients. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: LinkedIn Marketing John's Story Back when John had a day job in marketing, he was bitten by the entrepreneurial bug and wanted to start his own marketing agency. However, leaving a safe day job was hard when he was the sole breadwinner for his wife and three boys younger than age 10. In late 2012, with one client and enough money for 30 days, John decided to make the leap into starting his own business. To find more clients, John had a plan to use LinkedIn for prospecting. Until John started his business, he (like a lot of people) viewed LinkedIn only as a place for job-seekers and recruiters. Your profile was a résumé. But after he began viewing LinkedIn as a way to find clients, his perspective on the platform changed. Motivated by the need to feed his children, John stayed busy on LinkedIn bringing in clients for his marketing agency. Within 90 days, John had replaced his six-figure salary, generated revenue, and had a bunch of clients in the door. He had to start hiring staff and kept growing his business, continuing to use LinkedIn to get new clients. After a few years, the marketing agency felt too much like John's old job. He was managing staff and doing payroll instead of creating stuff. From there, John pivoted to helping people learn how to find clients on LinkedIn. In 2014, John published LinkedIn Riches. Then he created an online course (also called LinkedIn Riches). Today, John has a one-man shop, creating online courses and working with a small group of clients and customers. With his more entrepreneurial lifestyle, John can choose the things he wants to do, and LinkedIn has been the engine behind where his business is today. Listen to the show to hear John share how often he uses LinkedIn now. Why Prospect on LinkedIn? If you're looking for business-to-business (B2B) prospects, LinkedIn is the best place on the planet because it has the market cornered right now. No other B2B network has as many members and as much reach as LinkedIn does. Currently, LinkedIn has about 550 million members in 200 different countries, and two new members join every second of the day. LinkedIn is a behemoth and one of the most visible websites in the world. Looking for prospects on LinkedIn is effective because it's like a search engine for professionals. For all its members, LinkedIn has categorized, analyzed, sorted, tagged, and saved every little bit of data. By leveraging all that data, LinkedIn can help you find your prospects. For example,

03.30.2018

How to Get Started With Messenger Bots

Are you interested in Facebook Messenger bots? Wondering why you should use bots and how to set them up? To explore how to get started creating Facebook Messenger bots, I interview Dana Tran. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Dana Tran, a bot expert who writes about Messenger bots. Dana's course Bot Essentials can be found on her website ThinkTuitive.com. Dana shares the three things you need to consider before building a bot. You'll discover which bot-building platforms Dana recommends. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Facebook Messenger Bots Dana's Story As a digital coach, Dana helps people become more productive by teaching them how to make the most of technology. She first learned about Messenger bots after watching the keynote video from the Facebook 2017 F8 conference. After doing a bit of research, she developed her current focus on Messenger bots and how businesses can use them. Through her research, Dana was just amazed at how quickly and easily you can build an interactive experience. As a tech-lover, Dana loves playing with new toys, and Messenger bots were no exception. Dana saw something magical and special about Messenger bots. They're fun and interactive, and you don't need to code at all to build one. Dana also sensed that bots had lots of potential. Because bots were new at the time, not much information was available, so she decided to write blog articles and courses about bots. Listen to the show to hear why I was impressed with Dana's writing about bots. Why Use a Bot? In some ways, bots mimic email marketing, which is why some people refer to bots as email marketing 2.0. Bots can help you build your subscriber list, generate leads, deliver lead magnets, and broadcast messages. You can also combine Facebook ads with bots, include bots in an ad campaign sequence, or automate follow-ups. Beyond email marketing tasks, bots can answer basic questions. You can also ask questions that help you learn more about users. However, Dana emphasizes that bots are not smart. Right now, the biggest misconception is that Messenger bots can answer anything and everything. Dana notes that Facebook has tried to fix this misconception. David Marcus, the Head of Messenger at Facebook, said, "We never called them chatbots. We called them bots." The idea is that bots don't possess the ability to chat about anything. When you focus on using bots to answer basic, common questions, bots save a lot of time. You can automate certain tasks that don't require a human. To illustrate, if you have a store, people likely ask all the time about your hours that day or during the holiday season. With a bot, you can automate that task and free up your time for more meaningful conversations. Because Messenger bots are interactive, you can use them to customize what you share with people. Dana says this interactivity reminds her of the old Choose Your Own Adventure books she read as a kid. Also, this interactivity makes bots stand out as a great tool. For example, instead of sending everybody the same long email that tries to speak to all of the people on your list, a bot can ask a question to learn about the user. Based on a user's answer, the bot can tag them or save their response to a custom field and then follow up with...

03.23.2018

How to Build a Facebook Ad Funnel

Do you want more conversions from your Facebook ads? Wondering how funnels can help? To explore how you can build Facebook ad funnels that improve conversions, I interview Susan Wenograd. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Susan Wenograd, a Facebook ads expert who specializes in Facebook ad funnels. She's also a consultant and regular speaker on Facebook ads. Sue explains how video-based funnels create micro-conversions. You'll discover how to nurture prospects using a Facebook ad funnel. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Facebook Funnels Susan's Story Susan got her start in ecommerce in the mid-2000s, when she worked for Circuit City. Back then, her focus was email marketing and paid search. After she moved to another job, she learned about Facebook advertising. At the time, Facebook ads were easier to learn because Facebook had half of the advertising features it does now. Running Facebook ads, Susan was able to experiment and get to know the platform. She loved that these ads took her back to the marketing 101 stuff she enjoys: branding, content, the language you use, and so on. Facebook ads allowed her to use a little more creativity than paid search did. Listen to the show to hear Susan discuss how Facebook ads became one of her specialties. Common Mistakes When people set up a Facebook ad, they often choose the wrong objective. With a conversion-focused campaign, you can set up a multitude of conversions that you want to track or optimize for. These include custom conversions based on interactions with your site. The standard ones are view content, lead, add to cart, and purchase. Susan finds that people often pick a conversion objective that doesn't get a lot of conversions. For example, they'll target filling out a contact form on their site or something that just happens a handful of times per week. However, Facebook recommends that the conversion type you choose happens about 50 times per week per ad set. Those numbers are formidable. A lot of people don't know that, though, so they pick something that doesn't happen very often. When you run a conversion campaign that doesn't have enough data, Facebook isn't exactly sure how to optimize for it. With few exceptions, Susan finds that the Facebook recommendation is accurate. If you have a super niche audience with one kind of person who's buying one type of product, your campaign can sometimes work with a lower number of conversions. Essentially, Facebook needs at least 50 conversions to look at the users and see who they are and what they do in order to find other users who are like them. Without that data, Facebook just struggles. It doesn't really know who it's looking for. To maximize your ad spend, Susan suggests changing how you think about conversions. The ultimate conversion might be someone signing up for software or buying your product. But your audience takes steps before they convert that are also worth noting. Your initial engagement goal might not be your ultimate conversion goal, but a cue that helps you reach those who sign up or buy. For instance, a coach who sells an informational product wants customers who'll sign up for an expensive mastermind or a similar offering. People aren't going to do that right away.

03.16.2018

Personal Branding: How to Create and Market Yourself

Want to reach more subscribers, fans, or prospects? Wondering how building a personal brand can help? To explore how to build and use a personal brand, I interview Chris Ducker. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Chris Ducker, serial entrepreneur and author of Rise of the Youpreneur. He's also host of the Youpreneur Podcast and founder of the Youpreneur Summit. Chris explains how to define your niche of expertise and why doing so helps your business succeed. You'll discover tips for promoting your brand on podcasts, social media, and at live events. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Personal Branding Chris's Story Chris considers himself a traditional, old-school entrepreneur. Until around 2008, he used the Internet only to check email and watch YouTube videos. The businesses he owned had brochure-like websites that were boring and stuffy. By late 2009, Chris had burned out, as a lot of entrepreneurs do. In 2010, Chris and his wife set a goal: remove him from the day-to-day work of his businesses as much as possible. By October of this "virtual CEO" year, he had hired eight people to replace him, no longer worked in the office, and was working only 4 days a week. In his newly found spare time, Chris started podcasting, blogging, and shooting videos. He devoured Gary Vaynerchuk's Crush It! in 2 hours and saw a way to build a business going forward. By the end of that year, he had created an email list of about 5,000 subscribers and people were genuinely tuning into the Chris Ducker Show. A couple of years later, while Chris was recovering from back surgery, he began taking stock of how businesses were growing, where they were growing, and what people were doing to build them. That's when he came to a huge realization about the value of personal branding: In all of his companies' big acquisitions, people wanted to do business with him first. Only later were they working with his companies. That's when Chris launched ChrisDucker.com and his personal brand. I ask where "Youpreneur" came from and what it means. Chris says after his personal brand was in place, he started to attract people of the same mindset. These were speakers, content creators, authors, coaches, consultants, YouTubers, and live streamers. They were all building businesses based on themselves, their expertise, and their personalities. A Youpreneur is somebody who's building a business around who they are, what they stand for, how they want to be known, and whom they want to serve. Youpreneur launched in 2015 as an online community and continues to grow. Chris wrote a book and launched the inaugural Youpreneur Summit last year in London. The summit sold out 4 months before the event. It was a huge success and they're doing it again this year. Listen to the show to discover why Chris is happier working as an entrepreneur. The Importance of Personal Branding Personal branding has been around for a long time. For instance, Zig Ziglar is a personal brand everyone knows. What Zig did brilliantly, Chris explains, was to create a brand around his message and how he could affect change. Years after his passing, people still talk about Zig all the time. Some might call that a legacy. Chris calls it leaving a stamp on the world, because of an incredibly strong personality and person...

03.09.2018

Instagram Stories: How Businesses Can Make the Most of Stories

Do you want to create more engaging and effective Instagram stories? Are you using all of the Instagram Stories features available to you? To explore how you can use the latest Stories features, I interview Sue B. Zimmerman. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Sue B. Zimmerman, an Instagram expert who helps businesses and marketers take their Instagram marketing to the next level. She's the author of the Instagram Strategy Guide. Sue explains how she uses Instagram Highlights to drive traffic to her website. You'll discover how to enhance your Instagram stories with GIFs, location hashtag stickers, adjustable fonts, and more. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Instagram Stories Instagram Highlights Instagram Highlights are the best content from your stories, the clips you don't want to disappear. A story appears on your Instagram profile for only 24 hours, but a highlight lives forever unless you choose to delete it. On your Instagram profile, highlight reels are located below your bio and right above your feed. In your highlight reels, include the story clips that get a lot of eyeballs and engagement, which indicate your best content. Also, you can strategically name and brand your highlight reels. With a limit of about 11-12 characters, you have to keep names short, which has the benefit of making the names easy to read. Sue's Instagram profile has a few highlight reels. One, which is simply called Blog, features clips about her blog posts. After she shares a blog post through stories, driving traffic to her website, she can put the blog post clip from her story into her Blog highlight reel. Each highlight in this reel has an image and a note to swipe up, which takes you directly to the blog post. (Only business accounts with more than 10,000 followers have access to the swipe up feature.) Other highlight reels on Sue's Instagram profile are The Social Sip (her Facebook Live show) and Free Guide, which links to her Instagram Strategy Guide. Also, in her introductory highlight reel, Sue explains who she is, why she does what she does, and the value she can offer. An introduction highlight reel is a great opportunity to show people the faces behind your brand. Another example Sue gives is from an advertising agency with a great behind-the-scenes highlight reel. To name the highlight reel, the agency uses the acronym BTS. This agency also has reels for their team, events, tips, and office. I ask Sue how the analytics for stories compare to those for highlights. Sue says her story numbers constantly go up. She gets 1,000 to 2,000 views per clip. Her highlights also go up, although not as fast. She's gotten 700 to 1,000 views on a highlight clip. Sue says the best highlight reels are those that align the cover with the business and brand. You can change the cover, name, and image in the front of the highlight. To brand the cover, hire a graphic designer or use a resource such as Canva to create a simple image that reflects your business branding. For instance, the highlight cover for Sue's live show is a microphone in her brand colors. You then add that image to a story that you save to your highlight reel and designate as your cover image. (Also, don't delete the image from your story; doing so deletes the image from your highlight, too.)

03.02.2018

Twitter Engagement: How to Connect With People on Twitter

Wondering how to increase your reach on Twitter? Want tips for building your audience and boosting engagement? To explore the Twitter algorithm and creative ways to interact with others on Twitter, I interview Andrew Pickering and Peter Gartland. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Andrew Pickering and Peter Gartland, also known as Andrew and Pete. They authored Content Mavericks, and are known for creating highly shareable content, specifically on Twitter and YouTube. They also have a podcast called The Andrew and Pete Show. Andrew and Pete explain why engagement is essential to increasing your visibility on Twitter. You'll discover different types of tweets Andrew and Pete use to add value for their audience. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Twitter Engagement Andrew and Pete's Story Andrew and Pete's "bromance" started in 2008. They met at university, became great friends, and bonded over their ambition to one day rule the world. Although they planned to run a business together after graduation, Andrew also wanted to move to the other side of the country to live with his girlfriend so Pete decided to move to Newcastle and be the third wheel. As new, young kids in a big city, Andrew and Pete had no contacts and no customers but wanted to run a marketing company. Although the duo did the things they read about (tweeting, posting on Facebook, and blogging on their website), their online presence was doing nothing. However, in-person networking was bringing them a ton of business. At in-person networking events, Andrew and Pete stood out as a little bit wild. They threw chocolates across the room and always had party poppers. Soon they became known in their local area as the fun marketing duo. Andrew and Pete were personable and up for a laugh in person, but their online presence was corporate and boring. So they decided to put what was working for them offline into their social media content. After they began using social media to interact with others and create engaging content, their online presence started to take off. Their content would get shared and people started to know them online. This was in 2011 when there was only Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn. Twitter was the one that really suited them best. It was fun, fast-paced, engaging, and quick to use, but most importantly, open. Twitter was like those open networking rooms. They could walk in and say hello to whomever they wanted. Listen to the show to discover how we met at Social Media Marketing World 2015 and the impression Andrew and Pete made on me. The Twitter Algorithm When Twitter began using an algorithm to determine what users see, the algorithm didn't make drastic changes. That's because Twitter classifies itself as a news site, not a social media platform, and wanted users to continue seeing timely tweets. Even with the algorithm, Twitter is still the best place to find out what's happening right now. Facebook is more about what's happening this week, and Facebook's algorithm shows you more posts that are older. To understand the Twitter algorithm, start with the two main elements of your Twitter feed: your main timeline and a new bit called "In case you missed it." The main timeline is no longer chronological. You might see a tweet from half an hour ago, one from 2 minutes ago,

02.23.2018

Webinars: How to Market and Sell Using Webinars

Looking for a proven way to sell courses and consulting? Interested in boosting webinar attendance and conversions? To learn about selling products and services via webinars, I interview Amy Porterfield. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Amy Porterfield. Amy is an online marketing expert and host of the Online Marketing Made Easy Podcast. Her course is called Webinars That Convert. Amy explains how live versus recorded webinars impacts conversions and connection with your audience. You'll discover how to craft an effective email sequence for webinar promotion and follow-up. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Webinars Amy's Story Amy had her first experience with webinars when she worked for Tony Robbins. The webinar was a first for Tony too, and the response was great. About 800 people paid $100 to attend. The night before, Amy and Tony practiced for the webinar on the GoToWebinar platform. When they were done, Amy hit a button to end the practice session but accidentally deleted the webinar instead. In an instant, Tony and all 800 customers received an email saying, "This webinar has been canceled." A panicked Amy and team stayed up all night working with GoToWebinar to piece Tony's webinar back together. In that moment, Amy hated webinars and never wanted to do one again. However, by morning the problem was resolved. Everyone received a follow-up email saying the webinar was still happening. Although Amy was a nervous wreck, the webinar was a huge success. She then realized webinars allow you to connect in a very personal way. The connection aspect of the webinar was awesome and Amy was hooked. About a year later, in 2010, when Amy started her own business, webinars became the number-one way she promoted her online courses. Hey friends! I'm hosting a webinar all about Pinterest - if you're interested, join us! www.amyporterfield.com/pinterest Posted by Amy Porterfield on Friday, March 22, 2013 Although she's still had snafus, the wins outweigh the losses. Indeed, Amy has done webinars for all of her live launches except one, for which she did a three-part video series. However, she still added webinars afterward. Amy likes webinars because she loves to give before asking for anything in return. Webinars are a great way to teach and sell. Over the years, Amy has improved her ability to align the free content with the pitch, but giving is still her motivation for offering webinars. Before she starts a live webinar, she puts herself in this giving mindset by saying to herself, "No matter if they buy or not, they walk away today feeling excited, inspired, and driven to take action." Because Amy does a lot of business promotion, she appreciates the way webinars allow her to slow down. They allow her to make an impact before asking for anything in return. She's built a multimillion-dollar business primarily based on webinar promotions. Listen to the show to hear Amy's thoughts on improving something that works versus trying new things. What to Sell on a Webinar While some experts say you could sell anything on a webinar, Amy disagrees. Webinars are ideal when you're selling knowledge and the product allows someone to continue learning in a medium that's similar to the webinar itself. For example,

02.16.2018

YouTube Community Tab: How YouTube Is Changing

Want to keep your YouTube subscribers engaged? Interested in new YouTube features that help promote your videos? To explore big changes from YouTube, I interview Tim Schmoyer. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Tim Schmoyer, founder of VideoCreators.TV, a YouTube community of more than 340,000 video creators. He's the leading expert on building a loyal tribe on YouTube. Tim explains how creators can use reels, GIFs, and more to engage subscribers while producing videos that keep people watching. You'll discover how the Community tab content appears to subscribers on mobile and desktop. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: YouTube Community Tab: How YouTube Is Changing The YouTube Changes When most people think of YouTube, they think of uploading polished video that your subscribers and others can discover and comment on. However, over the past year, YouTube has added new features including Contacts (similar to Friends on other platforms) and the ability to post photos, polls, text updates, and quick little videos in the Stories format. The new features indicate a focus on community development and ways to stay in front of your audience beyond uploading polished videos because those take time to produce. A YouTube subscriber is similar to a follower on Twitter or a like on a Facebook page. In all three cases, someone is agreeing to see updates from you. However, a friend on Facebook is a two-way connection because Facebook friends see updates from each other. That's how contacts work on YouTube. After you have a contact on YouTube, you can send a video in a private conversation. httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=53SxHLXieXw The old-school way was to copy the URL and send it via text or Twitter. But if, for example, Tim and I are contacts, Tim could message me within YouTube and say, "Hey Michael, check out this new video from Gary Vee. I think this would be a great topic for you to talk about at Social Media Marketing World." In other words, the YouTube Contact feature allows you to share videos and have private conversations about those videos with a group of friends, similar to a conversation in Facebook Messenger. So if you're working on a project with several peers, you can create a group on YouTube to easily share videos related to that project. The group can then have an organized, structured conversation about the videos inside the app. Tim notes most of the new features, including Contacts, are mobile-only (not yet available on desktop). They're being developed on platforms where people seem most likely to be using these types of features. Reels is YouTube's answer to the Stories format on other social media platforms. A reel is a 30-second clip from your smartphone. After you record video for a few seconds, you can add emojis and stickers or swipe for different filters. When you're done, post the video to your reel and your subscribers can view it. You can set a reel so that it's only available for 24 hours or make it an ongoing, long-term reel. The 24-hour reels, which people are used to, are good for quick, behind-the-scenes posts. YouTube subscribers are notified of new reel content via mobile. At the bottom of the YouTube app, tap the Subscriptions icon and a row of channels to which you subscribe appears at the top.

02.09.2018

How to Use Video Content to Sell

Wondering how video can support your sales process? Looking for tips on how to use video in your marketing funnel? To explore how video can turn leads into customers, I interview Marcus Sheridan. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Marcus Sheridan, an amazing keynote speaker. Formerly known as The Sales Lion, Marcus is a partner at IMPACT, a digital sales and marketing agency. He also wrote the book They Ask You Answer and co-hosts The Hubcast Podcast. You'll discover how to create four types of video that are essential to a company's online sales process. Marcus explains the importance of involving your sales team in your videos and how to help them shine on-camera. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: How to Use Video Content to Sell How Marcus Got Into Video Marketing In 2009, when Marcus was still working full-time at his swimming pool company, River Pools, he started blogging, and by the end of the year, produced and uploaded his first video, "The Truth About Salt Chlorine Generators: Everything You Should Know." He filmed the video in his office at night. Because he lit the video with two big work-construction lights, Marcus says he looked too pale, like he'd been at the bottom of a lake for 3 days. Still, the video was a huge victory. When Marcus uploaded his first YouTube video and hit Publish, he realized it was a special medium. Because people have become visual learners, Marcus' philosophy at River Pools was (and continues to be) "Unless we show it, it doesn't exist." And today, the River Pools YouTube channel has a few million views. Marcus says that when similar businesses in the marketplace talk about what makes their company special, they all tend to say the same thing. So showing (instead of telling) prospects what you can do helps your business stand out. With the importance of showing your work in mind, The Sales Lion started teaching companies how to develop a culture of in-house video production. I ask about Marcus' show The Balance, which he produced for about a year. Marcus says there's so much content about the hustle and grind, and some people find it inspiring, whereas others find it depressing and demotivating. Marcus wanted The Balance to emphasize that you can crush it personally and professionally. Creating the show was fun and taught him a lot about the documentary process. That learning curve was messy. Although people tend to aim for perfection, video is humbling. It's messy. Because businesses will need to become media companies whether they like it or not, the time to start embracing that messy process is now. It will help you become comfortable behind and in front of the camera, as well as with the process of uploading and distributing video. httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vshxqIvSYCg By 2019, 80% of the content consumed online will be video. What percentage of your website is video and visual content? Because everyone is becoming a media company, you ought to start thinking of yourself as a one-person shop. Listen to the show to hear my thoughts about social media video trends in the next 3 years. How to Get Started With Video Content Over the last 8 years, Marcus hears most often not from business owners who need help, but from frustrated marketers. They know what would work and see the trends,

02.02.2018

Storytelling With Video: The Journey

Want to use video to help more people know, like, and trust you? Wondering how to create episodic video content that keeps people watching? To explore how and why we produce a weekly video documentary, I pull back the curtain on our show, The Journey. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I share my experiences leading up to and then creating The Journey. You'll discover how sharing the struggles of entrepreneurship has helped my team and business. I'll share tips for creating your own show. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Storytelling With Video My Early Storytelling When I was around 10 or 12 years old, I remember sitting on my neighbor's huge front porch and telling stories to the neighborhood kids. I'd make up crazy, fantastic 20- to 30-minute stories on the fly that involved all of my friends' parents and siblings. I guess I knew early on that storytelling would become important for me later in life. A proverb says, "Tell me the facts, and I'll learn. Tell me the truth, and I'll believe. Tell me a story, and it will live in my heart forever." The story I'm sharing in this podcast involves facing fear, facing giants, and going on an incredible journey. About a year ago, we did these NPR-style stories on our podcast and hired Jay Acunzo to do the series. The 5- to 7-minute stories came from Social Media Marketing World attendees and employees at our company, and were very well-produced. From the audio files and some B-roll footage, we then created videos and posted them on social. People absolutely loved the video versions of these stories. There was something magical about showing what was behind the story. Making a Party an Exceptional Experience Have you wondered what it takes to make a conference party an exceptional experience? Go behind the scenes at Social Media Marketing World to discover how we do it! - Erik Psst...want to join the fun? Learn more here: http://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/world17fbdoc1 Posted by Social Media Examiner on Tuesday, January 3, 2017 Up to that point, with the exception of our live video show, everything Social Media Examiner did was focused on the written word and produced audio content. The emotional response after we turned the audio stories into videos planted a seed inside my brain that would later germinate. I thought maybe we could do something more regularly with video. I had watched Gary Vaynerchuk (DailyVee) crush it with video. Around the same time, my daughter, who was turning 13, wanted to get into YouTube. It freaked me out, so I decided to see what it's like to create video content. I had this journey of 30 days of live vlogging, calling it an experiment. Because I didn't have time for produced video, I went live every day via my iPhone on a selfie stick so I could learn what having a daily vlog was like. I hiked canyons, wandered around the Social Media Examiner building, and got comfortable being the authentic me on camera. A lot of crazy stuff happened. I had flies fly into my mouth while I was live. I had trees smack me in the face. I tripped. I had people looking at me weird, like, "What the heck? Who's this guy wandering around with this stick and a phone on it?"   My journey to becoming a vlogger, maybe... Posted by Michael Stelzner on Thursday, April 6,

01.26.2018

Facebook News Feed Changes: Why We Need a New Strategy

Welcome to this week's edition of the Social Media Marketing Talk Show, a news show for marketers who want to stay on the leading edge of social media. On this week's Social Media Marketing Talk Show, we explore Facebook news feed changes with Michael Stelzner and other breaking social media marketing news of the week! Watch the Social Media Marketing Talk Show If you're new to the show, click on the green "Watch replay" button below and sign in or register to watch our latest episode from Friday, January 19, 2018. You can also listen to the show as an audio podcast, found on iTunes/Apple Podcast, Android, Google Play, Stitcher, and RSS. For this week's top stories, you'll find timestamps below that allow you to fast-forward in the replay above. Facebook Shifts Organic Reach for Page Posts: Last week, Facebook announced major changes to how it organically serves page posts from businesses and publishers. In a statement on the Facebook Media site, the company announced it will now "prioritize posts that spark conversations and meaningful interactions between people... [and] posts from friends and family over public content." While many marketers and business page owners took this to mean the end of their Facebook content reach or the effectiveness of their Facebook ads, industry experts have reassured page owners that this recent change merely requires an adjustment to their Facebook strategies and may actually benefit those using their Facebook presence to authentically engage and interact with their community. (5:22) One of our big focus areas for 2018 is making sure the time we all spend on Facebook is time well spent. We built... Posted by Mark Zuckerberg on Thursday, January 11, 2018 Facebook Tests New "Watch Party" Feature for Groups: Facebook is testing a new video experience called Watch Party. This new feature allows Facebook group admins and moderators to select any public video on Facebook (live or recorded) and share it with other members of the group, who can then watch at the same time and in the same place. The videos will also have a dedicated comment reel with everyone watching and reacting to the same moments together and creating a deeper shared viewing experience. Facebook watch parties are being tested with "a handful of Groups" but the company is looking to expand this new feature soon. (51:45) Instagram Tests New "Type" Feature for Stories: In December, it was reported that Instagram is currently testing five new fonts for Instagram Stories among users in Japan. This week, it was discovered that Instagram is now testing these fonts with a new text-only Stories format called Type. The Next Web reports that this feature appears as an additional option at the bottom of the Stories camera, along with Boomerang and Rewind. There are several fonts and backgrounds to choose from, but users can also upload their own image to use as a background or apply a filter that emphasizes the text. httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T-AtAmc-dr0 Instagram Adds New "Show Activity Status" Feature in Direct Messages: Instagram's new Show Activity Status notification in Direct Messages now shows other accounts you follow and anyone you have messaged in the past when you were last active on Instagram apps. Android Police reports that this option is found under Settings and can be disabled if you don't want others to see this alert. However, disabling also prevents you from seeing when someone else was last active on Instagram. Instagram starts showing activity status in direct messages https://t.co/ssVQlTzUor pic.twitter.com/Kxj3hN5iIL — Android Police (@AndroidPolice) January 18, 2018 LinkedIn Sunsets Groups App for iOS and Unveils Group Updates for Web and Mobile: In an email sent to group a...

01.20.2018

YouTube Ranking: How to Get More Views on YouTube

Want to increase the visibility of your YouTube videos? Wondering how to help your videos perform well with the YouTube algorithm? To explore how to get more views for your videos on YouTube, I interview Sean Cannell. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Sean Cannell, a YouTube expert who specializes in video influencers, video equipment, and video marketing. He creates videos for multiple channels with 200,000+ subscribers each. His course is Video Ranking Academy. You'll discover how to help your videos appear as suggested videos and rank well in search results. Sean explains how views, comments, and referrals from outside YouTube boost a video's ranking. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: YouTube Ranking Sean's Story Sean learned about producing video and doing it consistently through a volunteer role with his church. Around 2003, the youth pastor asked Sean to record weekly video announcements. The first year, Sean made 52 videos. Then he began creating videos for Sundays, too. So before YouTube even launched, Sean was producing 104 videos a year. By 2007, Sean was managing the church's YouTube channel and learning about creating titles and thumbnails. From that experience, Sean started a business creating wedding videos and commercials, and working with YouTubers, coaches, authors, and speakers to help them leverage the power of YouTube. After about 15 years of handling the different aspects of YouTube and video production behind the scenes, Sean launched his current business, through which he's built a personal brand. Sean's main personal channel, Think Media, has tips and tools for building your influence with online video. He focuses on the tools (cameras, lighting, microphones). He also helps people who want to improve the videos they produce or stream via a smartphone, or who want to level-up their video production. The other channel, Video Influencers, is a weekly interview show where video influencers share their best advice. Sean talks to YouTubers and people using video on Facebook, Snapchat, Instagram, or any other platform. All in all, since Sean started working with video, he's probably published more than 2,000 videos and thus has seen a lot of video data. Listen to the show to discover how Sean feels about his early videos. What YouTube's Algorithm Considers Most people think video views are the most important metric. If a video has a million or even 10,000 views, it must be amazing. However, a few years ago, YouTube changed the algorithm, and now minutes watched matter more than views. Minutes matter most, Sean says. The emphasis on minutes watched makes sense if you think about YouTube's perspective. A video with a deceptive (or clickbait) title may get only 1 or 2 seconds of view time because the viewer quickly realizes the video isn't what they thought it would be. However, when somebody commits to a video for even 60 seconds, it definitely has more value because it keeps viewers on the platform longer. The order in which Creator Studio displays YouTube analytics reflects this emphasis on minutes. The top metric is watch time, the second is views, and the third is subscribers. Although views and subscribers matter, YouTube is most concerned with viewer sessions. With watch time,

01.19.2018
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Do you want to diversify your social media advertising? Wondering how to make YouTube ads work for your business? To explore how to reach more customers with YouTube ads, I interview Tom Breeze. More About This Show The Social Media ...