All of It

By WNYC Studios

SHOW DESCRIPTION

Leonard Lopate hosts the conversation New Yorkers turn to each afternoon for insight into contemporary art, theater, and literature, plus expert tips about the ever-important lunchtime topic: food.


4.3

124 ratings


EPISODES LIST
11.19.2018
11.19.2018
11.16.2018
11.16.2018
11.15.2018
11.15.2018

'How To Get Rid of A President,' Marie Colvin, Cooking for One

David Priess joins us to discuss his new book, How To Get Rid of A President: History's Guide to Removing Unpopular, Unable, or Unfit Chief Executives, a darkly humorous historical look into how presidents have been removed or disempowered throughout history. Priess is also a former CIA intelligence officer who reported to Robert Mueller. On November 14, Priess will be in conversation with Chris Whipple at Barnes & Noble Upper West Side and on November 15, he will be at POWERHOUSE @ the Archway.    Journalist Lindsey Hilsum joins us (at 17:40) to discuss her new book In Extremis: The Life and Death of the War Correspondent Marie Colvin. On November 27, Hilsum will be in conversation with Dean Steve Coll at the Columbia Journalism School.   Chef Anita Lo joins us (at 35:10) to discuss her new cookbook, Solo: A Modern Cookbook for a Party of One. The life of a chef can be a lonely one, with odd hours and late-night meals, but Lo believes that cooking and dining for one can, and should, be blissful and empowering. In Solo, she gives us a guide to self-love through the best means possible—delicious food—in 101 recipes for home cooks. Recipe below:   Duck with White Beans and Kale Ingredients 1 duck leg, skin on, trimmed of excess fat and skin1 duck wingSalt and black pepper1 tablespoon olive oilAbout 1/3 cup of chopped onion1 clove garlic, thinly sliced½ cup of white wine1 bay leaf1 sprig thyme1 cup chicken stock (or duck stock)One 15- ounce can white beans, drained and rinsed well1 handful of kale, washed and sliced (about 1 ounce)   Heat a medium pot on high. Season the duck pieces with salt and pepper on both sides. Add the olive oil to the pot and swirl, then add the duck, thick- skin side down. Turn heat to medium high and brown, then turn and brown the other side. Turn heat to medium and add the onions. Stir and cook until the onions are translucent, then add the garlic and stir.. Add the wine, bay leaf, and thyme and cook until the wine is reduced by 2/3, then add the chicken stock and cover. Bring to a boil, cover, and leave to simmer over medium- low heat. Check to make sure there is still liquid in the pot (if it has dried up, add a bit more) at occasional intervals for about 40– 45 minutes, or until the duck meat is soft. Add the beans and the kale and cook another 5 minutes. Season to taste with salt and pepper, and enjoy.

11.14.2018
11.14.2018
11.13.2018
11.13.2018
11.12.2018
11.12.2018
11.09.2018
11.09.2018
11.08.2018
11.08.2018
11.07.2018
11.07.2018
11.06.2018
11.06.2018
11.05.2018
11.05.2018
11.02.2018
11.02.2018
11.01.2018
11.01.2018
10.31.2018
10.31.2018
10.30.2018
10.30.2018
10.29.2018
10.29.2018

'Ottolenghi Simple,' Reimagining End of Life, 'Making Time for Music'

Yotam Ottolenghi joins us to discuss Ottolenghi Simple: A Cookbook. Ottolenghi presents 130 streamlined recipes packed with his signature Middle Eastern–inspired flavors, all simple in at least one way: made in 30 minutes or less, with 10 or fewer ingredients, in a single pot, using pantry staples, or prepared ahead of time for brilliantly, deliciously simple meals. Braised eggs with leek and za’atar This is a quick way to get a very comforting meal on the table in a wonderfully short amount of time. It’s a dish as happily eaten for brunch, with coffee, as it is for a light supper with some crusty white bread and a glass of wine. The leeks and spinach can be made up to 1 day ahead and kept in the fridge, ready for the eggs to be cracked in and braised.  Serves six  2 tbsp unsalted butter  2 tbsp olive oil  2 extra-large leeks (or 4 smaller), trimmed and cut into ¼-inch/½ cm slices (6 cups/530g)  Salt and black pepper  1 tsp cumin seeds, toasted and lightly crushed  ½ small preserved lemon, seeds discarded, skin and flesh finely chopped (2½ tbsp)  1¼ cups/300ml vegetable stock  7 oz/200g baby spinach leaves  6 large eggs  3¼ oz/90g feta, broken into ¾-inch/2cm pieces  1 tbsp za’atar  1. Put the butter and 1 tbsp of the oil into a large sauté pan with a lid and place over medium-high heat. Once the butter starts to foam, add the leeks, ½ tsp of salt, and plenty of pepper. Fry for 3 minutes, stirring frequently, until the leeks are soft. Add the cumin, lemon, and vegetable stock and boil rapidly for 4–5 minutes, until most of the stock has evaporated. Fold in the spinach and cook for 1 minute, until wilted, then decrease the heat to medium.  2. Use a large spoon to make 6 indentations in the mixture and break 1 egg into each space. Sprinkle the eggs with a pinch of salt, dot the feta around the eggs, then cover the pan. Simmer for 4–5 minutes, until the egg whites are cooked but the yolks are still runny.  3. Mix the za’atar with the remaining 1 tbsp of oil and brush over the eggs. Serve at once, straight from the pan.      Chris Garcia and Brad Wolfe join us to discuss the Reimagine End of Life festival. Death remains one of the most taboo facts of life, but New York City is hoping to change that with a week-long, citywide festival exploring death through more than 250 events - from art exhibits and performances to talks, panels, and workshops. Unfolding not just in theaters and concerts halls, but also in hospitals, libraries, houses of worship, yoga studios, senior centers, and even cemeteries, Reimagine End of Life, which will take place from October 27th through November 3rd, will also tackle issues like racial and economic disparities at end of life and how the increasingly high costs of end of life care is leading to an economic crisis. Headliners include actor Josh Hamilton, cartoonist Roz Chast, National Poet Laureate Tracy K. Smith, comedian Laurie Kilmartin, and members of the band Dispatch.   Amy Nathan joins us to discuss Making Time for Making Music: How to Bring Music into Your Busy Life. Many adults who used to play an instrument haven't touched it in years because they can't find time to practice, are afraid their skills are too rusty, or are unsure of what kind of group they could join. Performing, practicing, and composing music may seem like unattainable goals for busy adults with non-musical careers. This book offers examples of real-life success stories from more than 350 adults who manage to fit music-making into their jam-packed schedules.

10.26.2018
10.26.2018
10.25.2018
10.25.2018
10.24.2018
10.24.2018
10.23.2018
10.23.2018

Approachable Recipes, Brilliant Fermentation

Dorie Greenspan joins us to discuss Everyday Dorie: The Way I Cook. Greenspan offer recipes for the dishes that she makes all the time, from miso-glazed salmon to lemon goop. Greenspan’s recipes are easy-going, providing swaps and substitutions. On October 22, Greenspan will be in conversation with Kerry Diamond at 7pm at the 92nd Street Y.   RECIPE FROM Everyday Dorie: The Way I Cook: "Ricotta Spoonable"Makes about 2 cupsTake a peek in my fridge, and you’ll find the usual staples—milk, butter, eggs and yogurt, and my favorite plus-one: “ricotta spoonable.” I started making it years ago and I’ve probably never made it the same way twice. It’s a mix of ricotta, lots of chopped herbs, freshly grated lemon zest, olive oil and plenty of salt and pepper. It’s simple but special.I prepare this year-round, changing the herbs according to what I have at hand, but I make it most often in summer, when I’m apt to fill the table with small plates of good stuff, things that don’t need to be eaten in any order and that lend themselves to mixing and matching. Put the spoonable into the mix, and it will match with beet salad (page 88), frittata (page 27), onion galette (page 54), charred peppers (page 39) and so many other dishes.A Word on the Ricotta: If there’s liquid in the container, it’s best to drain the cheese. Line a strainer with a double thickness of damp cheesecloth, place it over a bowl, spoon in the ricotta, pull the cheesecloth around the cheese and weight it with a plate or a can of something. Put it in the refrigerator and let it drain for at least 30 minutes, or up to 1 day.Alternatively, you can make the spoonable, scrape it into a cheesecloth-lined strainer and refrigerate until needed. Do this, and when you turn out the ricotta, the cheesecloth’s mesh pattern will be visible — it’s pretty.2 cups (492 grams) whole-milk ricotta, drained if there’s liquid (see headnote)1 large lemon, or more to taste3 tablespoons minced shallots, rinsed and patted dry2 scallions, white and light green parts only, thinly sliced1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil, plus more for drizzlingAbout ½ teaspoon fleur de sel or ¼ teaspoon fine sea saltFreshly ground pepper⅓ cup (13 grams) minced mixed fresh herbs, such as dill, parsley, tarragon, thyme, cilantro and/or basil 1. Put the ricotta in a medium bowl. Finely grate the zest of the lemon over it, then halve and squeeze the lemon and blend in the juice. Stir in the shallots, scallions, olive oil, salt and a healthy pinch of pepper. Taste for salt and pepper, then stir in the herbs. Cover and chill for at least 1 hour before adjusting for salt, pepper and lemon juice and serving.CHOICES: A dollop of this on a cracker or sliced baguette makes a good appetizer; more of it on dark bread with roasted tomatoes, charred lemons or sliced cucumbers makes a tartine; and a lot of it stirred into pasta makes a dinner.STORING: The spoonable is best the day it is made, but you can keep it for up to 2 days tightly covered in the refrigerator. Stir well before using.   René Redzepi joins us to discuss The Noma Guide to Fermentation: Including koji, kombuchas, shoyus, misos, vinegars, garums, lacto-ferments, and black fruits and vegetables (Foundations of Flavor). At Noma—four times named the world’s best restaurant—every dish includes some form of fermentation. Redzepi, chef and co-owner of Noma, and David Zilber, the chef who runs the restaurant’s fermentation lab, share never-before-revealed techniques to creating Noma’s extensive pantry of ferments. On October 22, Redzepi and Zilber will appear at 7:30pm at the 92nd Street Y. In addition, signed copies of the book are available via Kitchen Arts & Letters.

10.22.2018
10.22.2018
10.19.2018
10.19.2018
10.19.2018
10.18.2018
10.18.2018
10.18.2018
10.18.2018
10.17.2018
All of It Podcast

LAST EPISODE

How Eunice Hunton Carter To...

11.19.2018

Professor Stephen L. Carter, the William Nelson Cromwell Professor of Law at Yale Law School, joins us to discuss his new book, Invisible: The Forgotten Story of the Black Woman Lawyer Who Took Down America’s Most Powerful Mobster. The bestselling ...